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What to know about Oklahoma cannabis legislation changes

What to know about Oklahoma cannabis legislation changes

Oklahoma cannabis legislation passes

The 2022 legislative session has ended in Oklahoma, bringing with it over a dozen new pieces of legislation specifically impacting the medical cannabis industry.

OMMA Executive Director Adria Berry sent an email to cannabis business owners this week with details on the new legislation, while also thanking businesses for their cooperation and transitioning to Metrc. Metrc is a seed to sale track and trace system specifically designed for the cannabis industry.

While chosen to be implemented in September of 2020, it wasn’t until May 26, this year that the state finally forced the transition.

“Through the struggles and bumps in the road, we’ve taken your feedback, questions, comments and complaints directly to Metrc every single time. Some answers are quick and easy, others take days to solve. At the end of the day, I want you to know that we are working on every issue you’ve brought us and will not let problems go unsolved.” said Berry.

In addition to the implementation of Metrc, Oklahoma’s governor also signed thirteen separate cannabis-related bills into law this week. The laws still must go through a rulemaking process in which regulations are formed. The public will be allowed input in this process.

House Bill 2179: Creates a tiered commercial grower fee structure based on size and type of facility — annual fees would range from the current $2,500 to more than $50,000. Under the terms of the bill, processor license fees will be determined by volume and range from $2,500 to $40,000. Dispensaries will pay $2,500 to $10,000, based on annual sales. Testing laboratories will pay a flat $20,000. Effective June 1, 2023.

House Bill 3019: Adjusts packaging standards to allow clear packaging for edibles but requires opaque exit packaging for carrying out of the dispensary. Effective Nov. 1, 2022.

House Bill 3208: Places a moratorium on new business licenses between Aug. 1, 2022, and Aug. 1, 2024. The legislation itself takes effect July 1, 2022. OMMA will incorporate the legislation into new emergency rules that will take effect in July before the moratorium begins Aug. 1, 2022. Current grower, dispensary and processor licenses are not included in the moratorium. OMMA will accept new grower, dispensary and processor applications through 11:59 p.m. Aug. 1, 2022. Read more about HB 3208.

House Bill 3530: Creates a revolving fund to be used by OMMA to establish programs and provide funding to support county sheriff enforcement of medical marijuana laws and regulations. Effective immediately.

House Bill 3929: By Jan. 1, 2024, OMMA must promulgate rules to create a process validation program in which licensees may voluntarily participate. Effective immediately.

House Bill 3971: By Jan. 1, 2024, OMMA must create a “secret shopper” program by rule promulgation to purchase medical marijuana in dispensaries and send samples for testing. Effective January 1, 2024.

House Bill 4056: After receiving recommendations from QA lab and a committee of licensed labs, OMMA must promulgate rules by Jan. 1, 2024, that set out required equipment and standards to be used by all licensed labs. Effective immediately.

Senate Bill 1367: Enhances penalties for the unlawful diversion of medical marijuana products to someone not legally allowed to acquire or consume them. Effective Nov. 1, 2022.

Senate Bill 1511: Prohibits commercial grow operations within 1,000 feet of a school. The legislation makes an exception for established businesses. SB 1511 is already in effect — it was effective immediately when Gov. Kevin Stitt signed it in March.

Senate Bill 1543: Establishes OMMA as an independent state agency separate from the state Department of Health. Effective Nov. 1, 2022. Read more about SB 1543 on our website.

Senate Bill 1704: Requires all employees of medical marijuana businesses to apply for a badge/credential beginning Jan. 1, 2024, and allows OMMA to contract with a third party to provide those services. Effective Nov. 1, 2022.

Senate Bill 1726: Adds technology centers primarily used for classroom instruction to the list of school buildings that dispensaries and grows must be at least 1,000 feet away from. Effective immediately.

Senate Bill 1737: Outdoor growers must register as a sensitive crop, and all commercial growers must post signage at the perimeter of the property with specific information. Effective Nov. 1, 2022.

 
Connecticut cannabis retail license applications surpass 15,000

Connecticut cannabis retail license applications surpass 15,000

Connecticut cannabis retail license applications

Over 15,000 thousand people submitted applications for Connecticut cannabis cultivation licenses before the deadline this week. However the state is only handing out about a dozen licenses to start.

The state reported on Friday that they received over 8,000 applications just for the six social equity licenses they will be handing out. Additionally the state received another 7,000 applications for the general lottery.

The general lottery pool will reward adult-use Connecticut cannabis retail licenses.

The first lottery for social equity applicants seeking Connecticut cannabis retail licenses is expected to happen this week. After being chosen, the applicants will still need to be reviewed for eligibility before the general lottery can proceed.

There was no limit placed on how many applications one person could submit, making it likely that multiple applications were submitted on behalf of one individual. The large number of applications for so few licenses could be explained in part by this factor.

An additional 1,800 applications were submitted for micro-cultivator licenses. This license allows a licensee to grow in spaces between 2,000 and 10,000 square feet (3,048 meters). Other Connecticut cannabis retail licenses will be available to sell medical marijuana, operate delivery services, make cannabis infused food and beverages and other cannabis products, as well as package and transport products.

Connecticut legalized adult-use cannabis last July. The law allows residents over the age of 21 to legally possess up to 1.5 ounces of marijuana, or up to 5 ounces locked at home or in a vehicle’s glove box or trunk.

But retail recreational cannabis stores are not expected to begin operating in the state until late this year at the earliest.

New Mexico cannabis sales hit nearly $40 million in first month

New Mexico cannabis sales hit nearly $40 million in first month

New Mexico cannabis sales revenue numbers

In its first month of recreational cannabis sales, New Mexico brought in nearly $40 million in revenue.

After launching its legal cannabis industry on April 1, the state made over $4 million in its opening weekend. Through the rest of the month, adult use sales across 40 cities in New Mexico sold $22 million worth of cannabis products.

The remaining $17 million was medical cannabis sales.

Medical cannabis sales are exempt from taxes unlike recreational sales, so there was no tax revenue generated from the $17 million in sales for the month. The majority of the state’s recreational sales were in Albuquerque, home to roughly 564,000 residents.

The city alone sold nearly $15 million in cannabis in April. The next highest revenue generated was in Las Cruces at only $2 million in adult use sales.

Las Cruces is also home to the state’s first licensed cannabis lounge where consumers can enjoy cannabis in a public setting.

New Mexico communities that border Texas also saw a fair amount of sales in the first month of adult use cannabis in the state. Hobbs and Sunland Park sold $1.7 and $1.4 million respectively, including medical and recreational cannabis sales.

An analysis from Sun-News found that Sunland Park had the third highest sales per capita, likely due to “cannabis tourism” from Texas and Mexico.

New Mexico cannabis sales are taxed at 12% for adult-use, plus additional taxes from local jurisdictions. Final tax revenue numbers won’t be announced until May 25, but with current data it is expected that the state will make about $2.6 million in tax revenue for the month.

Additionally, the 12% excise tax rate on adult-use cannabis sales is set to increase to 18% in 2025. This is still a lower tax rate than neighboring states Arizona and Colorado.

It is likely that the 4/20 holiday helped to boost recreational sales in the New Mexico’s first month. However the state’s director of the Cannabis Control Division, Kristen Thomson, is still satisfied with how the state performed and anticipates continued growth in the future.

“New Mexicans showed up on April 1 ready to support local businesses selling high-quality New Mexico products, and they’re still coming,” Thomson wrote.

“Thanks to hard work by the dedicated people working in the industry, supply easily met consumer and patient demand. New Mexicans have a lot to be proud of in the launch of this new industry, which is already adding value to the state’s diverse economy.”

The CCD has projected that the New Mexico cannabis industry will create up to 11,000 jobs statewide, with $300 million in sales and $50 million in tax revenue in its first year.

California cannabis farmers markets? New bill would make it possible

California cannabis farmers markets? New bill would make it possible

California cannabis farmers markets could become a thing

It is not secret that small cannabis farms in California have had a rough few years. A new bill aims to help them out.

A new bill introduced into the Assembly Business and Professions Committee on Tuesday (4/26/22) would allow small scale cannabis farmers to sell their products at farmers markets in California. Introduced by Assembly member Jim Wood, he has seen the issues that small cannabis operations have dealt with and wants to give them a hand.

“It is no secret that cannabis businesses throughout the state are struggling, whether it’s taxes, compliance costs, competing with the illicit market or other challenges, but the focus of AB 2691 is to help legal cannabis farmers who grow less than 1 acre of cannabis get consumer recognition for their unique products, much as has been done for craft beer, artisanal wine and other family farm agricultural products. Giving these smaller farmers opportunities at locally approved events to expose the public to their products increases consumer choice and offers farmers a better chance to reach retail shelves which is their ultimate goal. This is not about circumventing retailers, but growing the industry overall. My office has always been open to those who may have concerns about this bill and I’m here to listen to their concerns and their proposed solutions.”

The Origins Council, a cannabis advocacy organization that represents historic, rural, cannabis-producing regions across California has expressed their support for the bill. Genine Coleman and the group’s 900 or so members have fought consistently for the rights and protections of small, local farms that have been in operation in the state for decades.

“The vast majority of them are producing half an acre or less of cannabis, so this is definitely a huge potential opportunity for our membership,” Coleman said. “For small-scale producers to have direct marketing and sales opportunities with consumers is really critical.”

However not everybody is on board with the new arrangement. The Executive Director of the Davis Farmers Market Alliance, Randi MacNear, says what she oversees is a “food business”. Even if the new bill passes, she says it is unlikely anything will change at their market.

“We really are interested in selling food, so at this point, cannabis is not a food,” MacNear said. “We’re trying to increase our local farmers. We’re trying to get new, emerging Yolo County farmers in here and give them a space to sell, so I think that probably we would stick with that concentration.”

MacNear did add that the decision ultimately comes down to the Davis City Council.

“I’m sure you’ll see some of this product at other markets but not here in Davis,” MacNear said.

Assembly Bill 2691 is now headed to the Assembly Appropriations Committee, where it must pass before entering the full Assembly followed by the Senate. If approved by all of the above, the bill goes to the governor’s desk for signing.

Supporters argue that the main purpose of this bill is to help small farmers who don’t have the same access channels to consumers as larger competition have the opportunity to grow their customer base and their brand at the local level.

First New York cannabis dispensaries to open on tribal land

First New York cannabis dispensaries to open on tribal land

New York cannabis dispensaries

The New York legal cannabis industry may be delayed by politicians and bureaucracy, but that isn’t stopping Native tribes from rolling out their own markets.

The Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe based in Akwesasne will be the first to launch a regulated cannabis market in New York state. Beginning April 15, several Tribal businesses will open their doors to sell cannabis flower, edibles and other cannabis products to consumers.

The Tribe is able to do so thanks to their Adult Use Cannabis Ordinance. The ordinance states that adults 21 years old or older can transport, possess, and use up to three ounces of cannabis and up to 24 grams of concentrated cannabis.

Once New York legalized cannabis officially in 2020, the option to legalize the plant on tribal lands became more enticing. Not beholden to state laws and regulations regarding the plant, the Tribe was free to establish their own regulatory framework to permit sales and possession.

The Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe is also the first in the country to regulate and license tribal member-owned businesses for cannabis.

According to the Tribe, licensing fees collected from legal cannabis operations will be used to keep community members employed and fund a wide range of community services. Additionally the funds will help support educational scholarships, public safety, road maintenance, elder assistance, health care, and community organizations.

Tribal Chief Michael Conners said he believes the system will benefit the community while providing a safe product for consumers.

“We are confident that the hard work of the tribally licensed cannabis business owners will result in loyal customers from beyond Akwesasne,” Conners said. “We know that it took a while, but we are confident that our system is designed to provide quality product, in a regulated system, with Compliance oversight and a qualified Board of Managers to see that all regulations are followed for the safety of our community and consumers.”