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The Real Dirt on Controlling pH

The Real Dirt on Controlling pH

How to fix cannabis pH problems

Cannabis pH is important. Everybody knows that.

Knowing the importance of pH and how to keep it under control however, are two sides of the same coin. In order to stay on top of your pH, you need to understand how it works. From how acidic or basic your medium is, to the water you add in, it all needs to be measured and monitored constantly.

What happens if you don’t pay attention to pH? You might notice a range of issues that resemble your average nutrient deficiency. But you can supplement every nutrient under the sun and never solve the issue if it has to do with pH.

“Well, you know, it depends whether you’re feeding the plant, or whether you’re just, you’re adding amendments in the soil. And growing in the soil, in the ground, or whether you’re growing and saving your soil mix, and you’re adding amendments to that, and you’re just watering. Because if you’re using liquid fertilizers, it’s naturally going to go be pulled down temporarily. The plant itself adjusts pH, you know?” – Uncle John

pH means potential hydrogen. Plants will pull up water, they make their own sugar, and are able to have enough energy to split water. So they split water off from hydrogen and oxygen. With that situation, you get extra oxygen. And that’s why plants emit oxygen, we can breathe.

But the hydrogen and some of the oxygen are used with carbon in order to make the plant’s body. There’s additional hydrogen ions that are emitted out the roots of the plant as well. The plant does that to break down minerals in order to suck the nutrients or minerals back up. So when you’re measuring pH, pH means potential hydrogen ions.

So there’s already hydrogen ions in the soil. And that reading that you get where seven is absolutely neutral means that that’s the difference between hydroxyl ions, which would be a buffer and give you high pH, and hydrogen ions, which would give you low pH. So really, what you’re looking at when you look at pH, you’re looking at what the plant can feed itself right away. And if it’s too high, you know, it’s not going to get certain minerals. And if it’s too low, then only, then it’s not going to get other minerals.

More Scale, More pH Problems

“We pH-ed every single, you know, gallon of water that went into the plants. And I mean, it is incredible at how vigorous like when you, when the whole combination comes together. Right? It is just incredible how vigorous the plants grow, how much better they are.” – Chip Baker

One of the benefits of growing on a smaller scale is that pH is much easier to control. Some growers may never even look at their pH and grow perfect plants. The issues start to arise when you scale up.

Managing an outdoor operation with plants in the ground takes a new level of commitment, and a lot more consideration for your pH levels. Through his years of farm visits and seeing what growers are doing right, John noticed that most growers who have a large scale operation use a Dosatron to control their nutrients and pH.

“Dosatrons aren’t really that expensive, but some people want to use one doser. And I had a customer in an heirloom tomato greenhouse in the central coast in California, and they wanted to be able to use one doser, that was it. And so you can mix our fertilizer line times 13 in that heavy concentration. And it will all go through, and you could set one D40 Dosatron to that. They make a D3000 now, and that can take one ml per gallon. So you can dial it in, say for 10 mLs per gallon really accurately. So you get one of those, and you get a maybe a D15 or a D40. And then you can put the others stock nutrient in through that.” – Uncle John

In This Episode

If you haven’t already guessed, this episode is all about pH! From what it is and how to monitor it, to the most common pH problems and the most complex, and how to solve them. Get the real dirt on pH and why it’s important in another awesome, educational episode of The Real Dirt with Chip Baker!

Transcript

Chip: Alright, look at who joined us, man.I tell you, I got two of my favorite people in here. I’ve got the famous Jessica Baker of Baker’s Genetics, Baker’s extract. How are you doing, Jessica?

 

Jessica: I’m doing well. How about you?

 

Chip: Oh, I’m doing excellent. I’ve also got a John Piccirilli here of Cutting Edge Nutrients. How are you doing, John?

 

John: I’m doing very well.

 

Chip: Well, I’ve gathered both you guys here today, because I want to show you something. 

 

Jessica: Okay.

 

Chip: Yeah, I’ve got some weed over here. 

 

Jessica: I see the weed.

 

Chip: Yeah, I’ve got some weed over here. This is all grown with Cutting Edge nutrients. These are Baker’s Genetics. What does that mean, Baker’s Genetics?

 

Jessica: I guess it means a lot of different things. For this purpose, this just means that you know, the cannabis that we have grown and are here, we’ve chosen the phenotypes from these seeds and decided which ones we want to keep.

 

Chip: So Jessica runs a clone nursery, and a dispensary, and extraction facility in Oklahoma City. Why don’t you pick out some weed and tell us about it over there, Jess?

 

Jessica: Okay, so this big jar is Lemon G 13 crossed with Do-Si-Doe. This is an archive seed that we have planted out and kind of chosen the ones that we liked the best.

 

Chip: Hey Pat, why don’t you pass the smaller jar over here? Here’s some Oklahoma greenhouse, John. What do you think? ‘Cause you’ve been all over the world, seen some of the finest weed in the world.

 

John: Whoa. I just, I picked out what I thought was gonna be a decent size, but it’s gigantic. 

 

Chip: [inaudible 1:41].

 

John: Terpenes.

 

Chip: Terpene.

 

John: Love this stuff.

 

Chip: I mean, G13 Do-Si-Dos from archive seeds, as part of this moonboat collection, I believe.

 

John: Definitely has a lemon and crystal.

 

Chip: Yeah. Yeah.

 

John: So what, is this being passed off as indoor? Don’t say that on the radio.

 

Chip: Just don’t say that on the radio.

 

Jessica: We have some indoor late G13 and some greenhouse.

 

Chip: You know, you know, we get to do it all. Indoor, outdoor, light dep, greenhouse, right? But you can tell, you can tell. You can tell the difference. You know, and you know how you tell, is the greenhouse nuggets are huge. 

 

John: Indeed.

 

Jessica: That’s mold resistant. The G13 was really mold resistant.

 

Chip: This was a really good strain for us here. Hit really well. Hey, could you pass over the –

 

Jessica: I’m rolling this one up as we pass.

 

Chip: Cookies and Cream? That’s the ball jar.

 

Jessica: Oh yeah, that’s right. This is the ball jar. This is a really good one, too. So this was Cookies and Cream, exotic genetic seeds. We planted a bunch of seeds. And then, we chose a couple phenotypes. Right now, there is, we’re in debate on which of the two top phenos we actually like the most. So to be determined on that one.

 

John: Has Ice Cream to it.

 

Chip: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. 

 

John: I like that.

 

Chip: It’s very vanilla-like, almost.

 

John: Mhmm.

 

Chip: Right?

 

John: Smooth.

 

Chip: Mhmm.

 

John: And when you crush it, it’s got more of the Cookies.

 

Chip: More, yeah. More of the Cookies. These are a great, great, great strain. Yeah, these were all Cutting Edge Nutrients – 

 

Jessica: Growers soil.

 

Chip: Growers soil. Hey dude, do we have any of our, the previous light dep crop, Jessica? The outdoor crop over there?

 

Jessica: I don’t think so.

 

Chip: I don’t think so either.

 

Jessica: Does not appear to be, we do at the dispensary, but –

 

Chip: Okay, too bad. Well, because of you know, one of the things we noticed, John is, we kind of got a large, fairly large operation. 30,000 square feet, you know, auto flower, 60,000 square feet of outdoor, then you know, another 8,000 square feet of this greenhouse, and 8,000 square feet of that greenhouse. And man, it’s a little overwhelming.

 

John: A lot of work.

 

Chip: It’s a lot of work, you know, we don’t have that many people that work out on the farm. And it’s also just, you know, we were talking about scale on one of the last episodes, it was hard to set the pH, right? And we worked on pH within the soil, and we tried to just balance it that way, and I think we did a pretty good job. Because our source water coming out of the well is 7.8 and that’s just straight well water here. And we’ve got a really kind of high parts per million. But, we were just adjusting the soil with enough acidity, where the pH would be balanced. And I feel like we did a pretty good job that way. And we did it in both like, the ground and in pots. But these crops right here, containers and we control the pH perfectly. The mold, the color, like, all of it improved, you know? It was dramatic. And you know, I’ve always seen what pH can do, but I’d like to talk to you about like, the importance of pH, and why we should think about it in our gardens, and how we should we should deal with it.

 

John: So, you took the pH of the water, but did you do a soil test to take the pH of the soil?

 

Chip: Sure, sure. 

 

John: What was that? 

 

Chip: Sure. We did it right. We sent it off to a lab, the water and the soil. And then the lab gave us a formula to adjust it down, right? The original pH of the soil was like, the 7.2, or something like that.

 

John: So you adjusted it down.

 

Chip: Down, yeah, yes.

 

John: With sulfur?

 

Chip: You know, we used, Jessica, do you remember what we used?

 

Jessica: You guys are being all serious over here. I’m like, coughing as I smoke this.

 

Chip: I think we used two things. Sulfur and acidic fertilizer, chicken shit, bat guano, and fish emulsion.

 

John: Did you use Plant Amp?

 

Chip: Well I mean, you’re just talking of a few acres of stuff here.

 

John: Right, right.

 

Chip: Right. Well, that’s why it was so hard like I’m saying. And that’s why we could only control specifically the pH on this one 8,000 square foot greenhouse. We could control it every single watering and how much better it did.

 

John: Right. And that wasn’t in soil that was in your soil? 

 

Chip: Correct.

 

John: Right. 

 

Jessica: The plant bags.

 

Chip: And to tell you it was even, I mean, the pH issues were in the potted plants that we were feeding on pH water. It was significant. The stuff in the ground, you could hardly solve the problem, right? I mean, it came out in the mold and the health of the plant, I think in the long run, right? As we get like, next to no mold, no bug problems in our perfectly pH-ed gardens. 

 

John: And you really saw a difference between that and the soil that wasn’t pH-ed? Yeah.

 

Chip: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah, big time. The stuff in the container’s not pH-ed. It’s kind of just crap, honestly. Like we ended up extracting it. You know, I’ve got a bad opinion. If it’s not great, great, great, great weed, I don’t even want it. It’s awful. Throw it away, you know?

 

John: Yeah, I can see that.

 

Chip: But you know, it’s a controversy to check your pH or not. Oh, you don’t have to check your pH. I never do anything for it. But you got to do something, right?

 

John: Well, you know, it depends whether you’re feeding the plant, or whether you’re just, you’re adding amendments in the soil. And growing in the soil, in the ground, or whether you’re growing and saving your soil mix, and you’re adding amendments to that, and you’re just watering. Because if you’re using liquid fertilizers, it’s naturally going to go be pulled down temporarily. The plant itself adjusts pH, you know? pH means potential hydrogen. So plants will pull up water, they’re pretty amazing. They make their own sugar, you know, and are able to have enough energy to split water. So they split water off from hydrogen and oxygen. With that situation, you get extra oxygen. And that’s why plants emit oxygen, we can breathe. But the hydrogen and some of the oxygen, oxygen are used with carbon in order to make the plant’s body. But there’s additional hydrogen that are hydrogen ions that are emitted out the roots of the plant. And the plant does that to break down minerals in order to suck the nutrients or minerals back up. So when you’re measuring pH, pH means potential hydrogen ions. So there’s already hydrogen ions in the soil. And that reading that you get where seven is absolutely neutral means that that’s the difference between hydroxyl ions, which would be a buffer and give you high pH, and hydrogen ions, which would give you low pH. So really, what you’re looking at when you look at pH, you’re looking at what the plant can feed itself right away. And if it’s too high, you know, it’s not going to get certain minerals. And if it’s too low, then only, then it’s not going to get other minerals. When it’s lower, it’s going to get calcium, iron and manganese, which is key for cannabis. So pH is important. But really being able to feed, like when you’re adjusting the water, the pH of the water and you’re adjusting it down, you’re giving the plant a chance to pull up some nutrition really quick. So it’s good to adjust the pH of the water when – adjusting the pH of the soil, that’s a long term process. That’s why I always used your soil.

 

Chip: Right. Well you know, and we do that too. I mean, I make potting soi. So of course, I love the potting soil. But like, we use all the technologies. I’d love to grow in the ground. It’s a little difficult to, you know, make containers for the thousands of plants we’re growing. We got a small operation. I like growing in the ground.

 

Jessica: I like growing in the ground too.

 

Chip: So what does this mean? You look like you came in here, Jessica, you fired up a joint, now you’re leaving?

 

Jessica: I basically have an appointment I have to go to. You know, I basically just came in here to make an appearance, to smoke you guys out, to make both of you look good today. Sorry about that.

 

Chip: I wanted – oh, okay. Well, maybe next time you’ll come out and we’ll have more of an in- depth conversation about pH.

 

Jessica: More profound conversation?

 

John: And she takes excellent photos, look at that.

 

Chip: I’ve been training. We’ve been training.

 

Jessica: I’ve been training. Chip’s been training me on photographs since the 90’s, back before digital photography.

 

Chip: She’s an excellent photographer now.

 

Jessica: And you know, I can, I’m okay. Sometimes I’m okay. Quite.

 

John: Oh, that was great. I mean that’s great on the IG.

 

Chip: Yeah, yeah, totally.

 

Jessica: Straight to IG, yo.

 

Chip: I mean, just a little bit of cropping, maybe a little color and trust me, you’ll be fine.

 

Jessica: Totally. Well, it was good seeing everybody. I’m good on that joint. I’ll leave that with you.

 

Chip: Okay. Hey Jessica, and if anybody’s interested in getting in contact to find out more about your live resins, batters, butters, sauces, diamonds and pearls, how do they get in touch with you?

 

Jessica: No pearls, but they can get in touch with me at jessica@bakersbrands.com. Or if you are interested in clones, clones@bakersbrands.com. 

 

Chip: You’re on Instagram, Facebook? 

 

Jessica: Instagram, @cannabis – no, hold on. Instagram is bakerscannabisoklahoma. Facebook, I believe is just @bakerscannabis. And, you know, I’m an acupuncturist and herbalist. So if you care about other plants @baker_botanica on Instagram. 

 

Chip: Alright, excellent. I’m glad we had that. That excellent visit with Jessica. She’s always so busy with stuff she’s doing.

 

Jessica: I’m always so busy. I’ve got important things to do. 

 

Chip: Okay.

 

Jessica: Bye. 

 

Chip: Bye.

 

John: Bye. 

 

Chip: Oh wow, she’s great. She always comes in in a tornado. She like, throws weed everywhere. She smokes the place out, and then she leaves. It’s like, the Lone Ranger or something. The Stoned Ranger. 

 

John: Absolutely.

 

Chip: Who was that masked woman?

 

John: And to you there in audience land, she was wearing a mask.

 

Chip: She was wearing a mask with that shirt. This crop here, you know, I really wanted to make it great. And so you know, we spared no expense. We used you know, your full directions of Cutting Edge fertilizer, your supplements, even your, some of your organic stuff. We pH-ed every single, you know, gallon of water that went into the plants. And I mean, it is incredible at how vigorous like when you, when the whole combination comes together. Right? It is just incredible how vigorous the plants grow, how much better they are. Man, you have to sacrifice like either the nutrition, or the pH, or the potting soil, because of the volume or the scale of it.

 

John: Yeah, I mean, pHing water is pretty important. A lot of people get this side benefit. So you know, in the western United States, you have a lot of calcium bicarbonate that comes up in the water. And by using phosphoric acid, it binds with the calcium causes to fall out, and then the bicarbonate gases off as CO2. You can do that. It’s good to also aerate. Even if you have a 5,000 gallon water tank, if you get a massive 5 horsepower air pump or something, and blow air into there, just big old bubbles, it’s going to cause the, if you pH down to 6, it’s going to cause all the calcium bicarbonate to fall out. And you have to have a Y at the bottom of your tank with two valves. One goes to your field, the other you know, runs off to somewhere where you’re going to create a lot of clay slop, because it’s going to take out the, the iron is going to take out the calcium. And, those two things in the forms they are in will tie up the fertilizers. 

 

Chip: So wait a second, you’re suggesting that, because I think I can use this on our farm.

 

John: Yeah.

 

Chip: Yes, because we have five capacity on tanks. And that’s probably why you said that to me. So subliminal there.

 

John: A lot of people have copied you and they have 5,000 tanks too. 

 

Chip: So I should drop my pH to 6, and then bubble the water vigorously. And then do you –

 

John: In 24 hours.

 

Chip: 24 hours either you turn the bubbler off, let it sit and then you drain out the sediment?

 

John: It’s already had a chemical reaction.

 

Chip: So it’s already settled.

 

John: Right. So by turning it off in an hour, the rest of it that’s maybe coming up from the bottom will all settle out. And you’d be surprised, you know. When your water is 7.2, when your water is 7.6, there’s so much more of that calcium. You turn on that waste valves –

 

Chip: It’s unusable to the plant. 

 

John: Right.

 

Chip: Right. 

 

John: It’s unusable to the plant. It’s just, it helps buffer the soil. It’s one of the reasons why you have higher pH soil. I mean, you see that a lot of red clays. And, you buffer it more. It’s not necessarily good for the plant, for the type of plants we’re growing. And when you turn on that waste line that comes from the tank, maybe nothing will come out. You’ll have to kick that line. And then slowly, you’ll see like, this extruded clay coming out. That’s all junk that’s tying up your nutrients. And you can add more nutrients and overcome this, but I’m not trying to get rich on this radio show. I’m trying to tell you how to save money.

 

Chip: No, you know, and that’s where we’ve always really aligned, John is like, we just want to help people grow. And you know, people will come in, and I’ll give them the easiest way to solve their problems. But they want to spend some money. And so they like, buy a problem solver, right? But I always offer the mechanical solution to people first, if there’s one. Something they can easily do by hand or, this  is great. ‘Cause we’ve kind of talked about this before, I’ve had bad water in the past for sure. And not that our water is just awful, but it does come out of the well at 400 parts per million?

 

John: Yeah, you’re right there with calcium bicarbonate.

 

Chip: Yeah, that’s calcium carbonate, for sure. For sure. So alright, well, I’m gonna try this man. And now will this change the pH, will this change the EC or the ppm of the water?

 

John: Yeah, it’ll definitely change the ppm of the water coming out. And you’ll see that you’re going to use less fertilizer to be able to get to the same point. And then if you use compost tea, you’re going to use less fertilizer. I have customers that I’ve told this to, when they followed that through, they came back and I said, “I pretty much can guarantee you’re gonna be able to cut your fertilizer bill by 30%.” But they used tom tea enough and they cut it by 50%. And I was like, that’s great. And he looked at me like I was crazy. But you know, it’s not about –

 

Chip: Oh yeah, yeah. No actually, I want people to be more effective with the fertilizers and the products we sell. And they’ll be better businesspeople, they’ll make more money, they’ll be better growers. And, you know, they’ll remember that. They’ll come back and do more business with us.

 

John: Right, and what one of the groups of people that we’re always focusing on is phenotype hunters. You really need to have your program dialed in to see what the genetic potential is of what you’re working with. And there’s quite a few people out here in Oklahoma doing that now. It’s pretty exciting.

 

Chip: Oh, Oklahoma is the pheno hunting capital of the world right now, I think. With what’s happened with the cannabis seed industry, right,  at the same time, and the light regulations in Oklahoma allowing for no square footage issues, no plant issues, you plant as many seeds as you want. Right? We just got off a 4, 500 – it seems like we plant about 4,500 seeds for 10,000 square feet. So it’s been working for us. And we just have been doing it over and over again. Auto flowers, traditional male, female plants, feminized, photo sensitive plants, it’s been great, man. It’s just really, really been incredible to see all the different genetics, all the different phenotypes, to see the breeders that are for real.

 

John: Right, yes.

 

Chip: Right? And the ones that aren’t, because they’re out there, man. They’re out there. Hey then, I’ll tell you this. CSI and Archive, I know you guys have heard me talk about, I know you guys know these guys are my friends. But man, they got the best shit. Like, we planted 20,000 seeds out probably this year, and theirs were the best. Absolutely. The strongest, the most vigorous, the most what they said they were gonna be. Just the quality of the flower like, it was just incredible. So CSI, Humboldt, Archive Seeds.

 

John: Yeah, and Finest is right there too.

 

Chip: Oh, man, we’ve planted a bunch of Finest. I mean, there’s a lot of great, great breeders out there, don’t get me wrong. But I mean, we planted out Brothers Grimm Seeds this year. We planted out Exotic Seeds. We planted all the bests, but of everybody’s, dude. CSI and Archive’s. They were the best.

 

John: Yeah, and there’s breeders that came from California here like Brandon Rust, who won third place in the Cowboy Cup with Death Breath. It’s an amazing flower. I’m sure now it’s probably unobtainium because it really is that good? 

 

Chip: Unobtainium. I’m gonna write that one down. Unobtainium.

 

John: You cannot find it probably.

 

Chip: Unobtainium. Yes, scale is going to be one of Oklahoma’s biggest problems, right? And this water quality, this pH issue has absolutely been one of my biggest problems. But there’s this bro science with the, you know, with limited success comes this like,  enforcement on something that’s actually didn’t, was a negative but since, you know, it worked out for you, you thought it was a positive. Right? And I literally just this past week got in just two different like, conversations with people on pHing their containers, right? They’re growing inside, they’re small growers, they’re not even at scale. And, their argument is, “I’ve never pH-ed my plants, and my plants are fine.” And they’ve just never had a pH problem. And it’s easy not to have a pH problem when it’s small like that, but when it scales, that’s really, really when you, really when you see it. I know you’ve seen some big farms here and in California. Like, you know, what are some of the ways that people deal with fertilizer injection and pH control? 

 

John: Well, there’s a whole range of ways to deal with pH and injectors. And it seems like – 

 

Chip: Let’s keep it with container-grown.

 

John: Okay. Yeah. Yeah, okay.

 

Chip: Okay. Since I’m make potting soil and all.

 

John: Dosatrons. Dosatrons are really popular. You know, they’re powered by water. You put a clipboard up and just clean it no matter what, every month. And they’re easy to take apart, easy to clean, no reason not to use them. You know, all our fertilizers go through those. 

 

Chip: You know, I see Dosatrons being used two different ways. We’ll get to the nutrient first, and then we’ll go to the pH, because this is the pH show. I see way number one is where you have five different components. And so, you have five different Dosatrons. The best way to do this is to dilute all of your nutrients with distilled water, at least by half, and then you can use a large volume to come through the Dosatron. Right? And in my opinion, the most success I see people doing really well, this well. And you know, it’s a siphoning unit. So, it just works better if more volume goes through the unit. And when you’re talking about a mL of a nutrient, like, it really is better to have two mL go through the Dosatron than one or even five, honestly. And then the same thing with the, any of the NPK. But the other way, is people take one large stock tank, they mix like 55 gallons, right? And they fill it halfway full of water, and then they put all the stock nutrients in the tank, all their 5 or 10 different components. And then they have one Dosatron. Is there any preferred method or any reason to use one over the other?

 

John: Well, the cost. You know, Dosatrons aren’t really that expensive, but some people want to use one doser. And I had a customer in an heirloom tomato greenhouse in the central coast in California, and they wanted to be able to use one doser, that was it. And so you can mix our fertilizer line times 13 in that heavy concentration. And it will all go through, and you could set one D40 Dosatron to that. They make a D3000 now, and that can take one ml per gallon. So you can dial it in, say for 10 mLs per gallon really accurately. So you get one of those, and you get a maybe a D15 or a D40. And then you can put the others stock nutrient in through that. Because you don’t want to mix calcium with everything else. Otherwise you get locked out, right? So –

 

Chip: Even if you dilute it halfway with water?

 

John: Yeah. You can’t take that chance because then, somebody does that inside, and then they do it in their greenhouse and they want to do it in the field, and they get evaporation in the field. And then you get that problem again. And they, you know, by the time they’re out in the field, they’re hiring so many people and they have other operations going, they’re not watching things closely. 

 

Chip: So I mean, what you’re saying is you really suggest at least two Dosatrons.

 

John: Yes. Two.

 

Chip: Two Dosatrons. One for your major calcium component, and then the rest could go all mixed together. Now if I’m using your three part, how would I,  put the micro under one dose, and then mix the grow and the bloom in a stock solution with 50% water?

 

John: Yeah, you don’t even need 50% water. 

 

Chip: Oh, you could just mix it straight. 

 

John: Mix it straight. Yeah, I made it that way for that reason, because I using dosers.

 

Chip: I didn’t realize I could I mix it straight. I’ve diluting it for years.

 

John: Oh really? I just did all this for myself.

 

Chip: Yeah. That’s why I developed all this stuff, dude.

 

John: That’s why you develop your soil right?

 

Chip: Oh yeah, hey man, this new plant in bags I have, the five gallon plant in bags. I mean, they made it to where I’ve just got three people that work with us. And we just ran 8,000, 10,000 square feet greenhouses, like over and over and over and over again, all summer long, I did it with three people, right? Three different sets of 8,000 square foot greenhouses pull, you know, multiple times over the course of the summer. The only way we could do it is with those plant in bags, the absolute only way to be able, to like, finish the crop. Take the old potting soil old bag out, and replace it immediately with a fresh bag plant in bag like, the labor savings was incredible. Incredible. And yeah, I knew that. And so that’s [inaudible 26:21] myself.

 

John: You know, we make our own mistakes on our own, on our own money, right? And then we try to come up with a solution, and then it becomes the product for your friends. And then it goes. Now, probably people listening are friends of our friends of our friends of our friends. It’s really gone out there now, but a lot of people doing it.

 

Chip: Oh, man. Everybody that comes in my shop’s so friendly. Rarely do I have someone who’s uncool.

 

John: Yeah, yeah. I mean, they go somewhere else for a reason.

 

Chip: So how do we deal with the pH with the dosers? How do you see people dealing with the pH?

 

John: So you don’t have to worry about the pH using our fertilizers, but there are other fertilizers that you want to adjust the pH. The actual, organic –

 

Chip: Because when you use your, just your three part, it adjusts appropriately?

 

John: Yes. You don’t have to adjust. It’s available from a pH of 3.5 to 9.

 

Chip: So it’s not that it adjusts the pH in the water, even though it will change the pH, it’s just available at the large ranges.

 

John: Right, right. They’re food grade components that are meant to use, you know, mountain spring water, Fresno ditch water or, you know, water sources from anywhere in Oklahoma. 

 

Chip: Sure, no, I set mine just to let you know, I set mine religiously at 5.8 if I can with your nutrient. And I suggest everyone do that too. You know, I hear people do it all kinds of ways.

 

John: Yeah. Well, so many people, you have to plan for people who don’t do anything at all.

 

Chip: Yeah. And so that’s how you did it.

 

John: Right. And then so – 

 

Chip: And hey, that’s how all of our other crops like I was saying earlier in the conversation is, you know, we weren’t able to pH it. We just put the nutrient in the tank, put it in the Dosatron and didn’t pH the water at all. You know, and it went out there. And we grew a lot of great, great, great weed. I should say good weed that way. But like, wow, man, it just got great as soon as I controlled all the nutrition, all the pH,.

 

John: Right. Well, in that case, you’re cutting out the calcium bicarbonate right? So you are gonna get a benefit all those fertilizers are available. And you know, that’s a side benefit of adjusting the pH and then aerating it even further does that. And that’s why people used to aerate their reservoirs.

 

Chip: Sure. I’ll be missing that. Yeah. Well, you know, we did use some. I have seen some really bad water here and the interaction with cheap fertilizer, right? I have seen it fall out. I’ve seen it clog. Like, we’ve had so many calls from customers who was like, “Oh, that drip irrigation, the filter’s not working,” right?

 

John: Or it’s working too well. 

 

Chip: And that’s what it is. It’s actually like, it’s clogging all the time. And you talk to people and it’s like, oh, man, they’ve got really bad water. And they’re putting all this cheaper, you said it earlier, salt fertilizer in it. And it’s just creating this sludge at the bottom of the tank. Sludge, like in their lines, a paste or a clay, you said it. 

 

John: Yeah, the calcium.

 

Chip: Yeah, on the inside of the filters. And we of course suggest everybody use the oversized Netta thin filters and promote the bigger ones, right? But yeah. Here, it’s a problem. We’ve seen it.

 

John: Yeah. I mean, a lot of people out here are pumping out of ponds, and they really need to use a sand filter. But you asked me about it, adjusting the pH on these other doser systems like, like doser system like Agritech from, that Mike has over in Colorado.  Great doser system, uses peristaltic pumps. So it turns in, it turns out exact amounts. So you could do it when you’re –

 

Chip: Set up a siphoning unit, it has the paralytic pumps that proportionally pull it out, and then add it.

 

John: And then add it. And you can add as many of those pumps as you want. So you could have 12 different inputs, if you would like.

 

Chip: And that’s the best way to deal with the pH is with a paralytic pump, right? Instead of –

 

John: Well, they still have pH dosers. I mean, pretty much even Dosatron has pH dosers. I go to a lot of places and I see super high tech doser systems that either inject with air, actually use 100 psi air to inject the fertilizer into the line as it passes by. And I feel like that mix is best. Here in Oklahoma, there’s Andersen injector systems. 

 

Chip: Oh, yeah, yeah. We’re a dealer for Andersen.

 

John: Oh, really? 

 

Chip: Yeah.

 

John: Interesting. Do you have one in your store right now?

 

Chip: No, we don’t. But I’m going to put one in my greenhouse this next year.

 

John: Yeah. Those are –

 

Chip: I think Chris has got one in his greenhouse.

 

John: Oh, really? 

 

Chip: Yeah. 

 

John: Oh, cool. 

 

Chip: Yeah.

 

John: Yeah. 

 

Chip: He brought them in. They met together somehow. But yeah, really great systems. Nice people. Good, good customer service.

 

John: Oh yeah, great customer service. They’re right here in Oklahoma. And they, it’s all metal, right? So it’s really, it’s stainless. At least the ones I’ve seen at trade shows. I actually haven’t been to a facility that uses that. Other people have gotten so far in a different direction, where their doser systems are $120,000. And they’ve got a touchscreen interface and a number of different things. And it seems like people touch them wrong, and they don’t, and they’re so sensitive, they don’t like to be touched. Because they, in an A and B tank situation that was both supposed to go at the same time, it might forget, it might now have been taken offline for the B tank. And now your whole fertilizer program is out of whack. So I mean, surely there’s safeguards for all these things. But sometimes in doser systems, I like to see people just keep it simple. And I think Anderson, although it looks sophisticated, you know, it looks complex, I think it’s simple. And Agritech is still simple, and Dosatron is still simple. Other injector systems, you know, run off the entire, the environmental controller. and that’s interesting. But that’s more complex, and that would take another, a complete show to describe. But just sticking to the simple stuff of, should you be using pH up and down, I never recommend, okay, using pH down, as instead of using pH up. Always just use, bring the pH down, never try to bring the pH up. That –

 

Chip: Leave it where it is.

 

John: Leave it where it is, because that locks things out.

 

Chip: Even if it’s like really low? Or, you know.

 

John: I mean, what’s really low? Some people run our Plant Amp really low and then our pH will be going into the plant will be 4, and will panic. We get these calls all the time. And we go, “Look. It says do not adjust the pH.” Read it on our –

 

Chip: Oh, we’ve had the calls to the shop too.

 

John: Yeah, right. And I just say, “Well, look, why don’t you measure the pH of the water coming out the bottom or the fertilizer?” And they’re like, “Well, it’s 6.2 or 6.4.” I’m like, “Isn’t that perfect coming out of the bottom?” It’s like the plant is pulling out organic acids and converting and taking up the calcium. 

 

Chip: So don’t adjust up, just adjust down. I preferred this for years anyway. I mean, there’s more than one type of pH down too, right? We’ve got you know, nitric acid, phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, citric acid, which is their preferred product –

 

John: On Plant Amp, we have some other complex acids from the biochelation process but you know, just sticking to the ones you mentioned, you know, nitric acid, well you got nitrogen. Sulfuric acid, you know, sulfur get locks up with calcium, and you get calcium sulfate, which is gypsum wallboard, right? And you really don’t want that. And citric acid, you know, it’s a partial key later, but you can only use so much of that. Phosphoric acid, it’s kind of the choice of the industry.

 

Chip: Sure. I’ll have to say I use nitric. Because it’s so much more effective.

 

John: It is.

 

Chip: I used it when I can get it. Actually, this year, we just had to use the, for half the year we used phosphoric acid, right? Because we couldn’t really get the nitric.

 

John: Really, I wonder why.

 

Chip: I mean, it’s just a rough year on supply this year. 

 

John: Oh, yeah, that too.

 

Chip: Right? I mean, you know it. I mean, we had so many, you know, issues, just shipping stuff around, or like, you know, warehousing issues, or people manufacturing issues, and then demand issues, everybody wants the product.

 

John: Well, they want it more and your customers that buy a normal clip, all of a sudden, they doubled that. Because they’re like, what if we can’t get it? I mean, that’s why I got another warehouse and filled it full of product. And got another warehouse and filled it full of inputs, because in the beginning, I saw it coming down.

 

Chip: You’re kinda in Oklahoma a lot these days. I mean, I’ve seen you a bunch lately. What’s going on with you here?

 

John: I’m just following the herd, like the bison.

 

Chip: Follow the wind, man.

 

John: You know, you’ve got a lot of, a lot of my customers from Michigan, Washington, Oregon, California, other states, but those four primarily, who our legal operators have moved to Oklahoma, to open up. And, you know, there’s a number of reasons for that. I mean, look at the transportation. I’m in Tulsa right now. Well actually I’m here in OKC talking to you, but you know, even here, you just look at the map, and you’re like, “Well, I’m two hours from 40.” And that’s where all the rail lines run, you know? You’re really close to Norm and where it’s like the highest rail traffic in the country, you know? You go two hours from here, and you’re at 70. Two hours further, and you’re at 80, you know? Going back down south again, you know, there’s the railhead in Norman, you could send things down to the Gulf. Now you’re shipping them all over the world. So, you know, what is someone going to do? Well, it would be a good idea to have a growing facility here in Oklahoma.

 

Chip: R&D.

 

John: Right. You can do a big pheno hunt, for one. It seems like the state is just encouraging that.

 

Chip: Oh, yeah, it’s great man. Like, Oklahoma is right off the center of the country, we really are here. It’s a great place to measure what the rest of the country is. I know there’s lots of stereotypes about it here. But, you know, this is like average America, really. Right? This is, it’s average, it’s new to the cannabis industry, and they’re really embracing it great. It’s incredible, right? As opposed to like, the other markets we’ve been involved in, you know, it’s this whole exclusive market scenario. And man, I just like that weed’s for all, and it should not be exclusive. Anybody should be able to get involved with it, in my opinion.

 

John: Yeah. Well, you know, I’d like to say people are friendly and accepting. But I think we’re going too far in boosting Oklahoma. Being a Californian, people would say, Northern California, I don’t want to go there. There’s gardens everywhere, there’s farms, there’s violent people. And then when they get there, they find people friendly and accepting and open and a big community.

 

Chip: It can be.

 

John: And then people started moving to California. So now, it went from when I first got my driver’s license and it was about 11 million, to now, there’s 40 million people. So I was in Colombia earlier this year. And, you know, I was warned about going to certain places, and trying to look for seeds, or doing anything that would stir up locals, because they’re hostile. So I went down there and it reminded me –

 

Chip: So you went down there and you were like, “Hey, man, you guys got any weed seeds?” Right?

 

John: I was invited down there. I was invited down there by some hemp farms. And I got down there. And then I realized, you know, it was like being in California 30 years ago. And they’re very friendly and open, and they’ve got great food, good attitude. But in the end, I had to tell them. I said, “Look, when I go back to California or the United States, I gotta tell people that you’re violent, crazy people, because if they do to Colombia what they did to California.”

 

Chip: I’m just gonna change here, too. This is similar to Oregon. Similar things are going to happen here that happened in Oregon. I think that Oregon was a good dry run for that. I think we need to be prepared for all of those things here.

 

John: Right. Well, you know, and how do you prepare people, right? So in Colombia, how do you know how do you prepare people there? California, well, they’re already there. You know, I live in Sonoma County. So I haven’t looked personally at the number of lawyers in Sonoma County and actually know the number, but I think it’s the same number as the entire state of California. So, you know, in an earlier realtor program, we were talking, you know, I was introducing myself and a little bit about my past. So, in ’78, you know, part of the reason I ran away from home in Berkeley was because in the Bay Area, 1 out of 82 people were lawyers. And if you study history, Rome, a 1000 year Empire fell when one 1 of 4 people were lawyers. So I thought, you know, I was only 14, what did I know?

 

Chip: Alright, alright, alright. Right now, I’ve got like, 10 fucking attorneys in my life. And I love you all. I love you. I love you all. Don’t listen to what John’s saying.

 

John: Okay. I have to say. I’ve got a great tax attorney. I’ve got a great business attorney. And I’m good to, I’m good with just that. But to negotiate, because I’m sure Chip’s talking about California and not Oklahoma that he has these lawyers.

 

Chip: No, I’ve got attorneys here too, man.

 

John: Oh, really? 

 

Chip: Come on, bro. You know, I’m always seeking extra knowledge and attorneys, especially cannabis space attorneys are a great place to get it. 

 

John: Right. 

 

Chip: Right? I’m always doing business. Different states, different people. And you kind of end up with like, different attorneys for different things you know? So I’ve got like, a great set of attorneys for any major issue or problem. There are my Cultivate Colorado attorneys. I’ve got a west coast attorney, right? Because you got to have one, that’s rough ground over there. 

 

John: Oh, sure. In each state, they can only practice once.

 

Chip: And man, you know, I’m currently in some litigation. You know, I’m fighting the good fight here. And so I’ve got some aggressive attorneys, right? And they’re fighting, helping me fight for my rights and our rights as cannabis farmers in California. And then I’ve got some attorneys that just tell me what all the rest of the attorneys are doing. This is no shit. This is a great thing to do, John.

 

John: Well you see, you’ve gone through a lifelong selection process of attorneys.

 

Chip: Oh, yeah, yeah. Oh, man. Cedarburg, Brian, Josh, Christian, those guys, I’ve been with them 10 years. You know my guys over at Fairchild and Roth field or something like that.

 

John: Big firm.

 

Chip: Big firm. I’ve been with those guys for 15 years. You know, I mean, you know, my people in California, I’ve been with them for 10 years. I mean, in business, you need an attorney. Doesn’t matter where you are, you’re gonna need one. You need somebody to write contracts for you, you need somebody to be able to ask questions to. Like, “Hey, is this,” you know, “Can I? What do you think about?” Because you’ve had your fair share of legal issues? 

 

John: Oh, sure. Of course, and being in business –

 

Chip: Business legal issues, man. Oh, I don’t like the way you did this, John, I’m suing you for it. You know?

 

John: Right. Right. And you’ve got to have an attorney with decades of experience to get it, to turn it back from that to, “Let’s negotiate this, let’s arbitrate this. This is gonna go to court.” And yeah, Ray Erlach is my business attorney in California. And Geoffrey Titus is my tax attorney. And you know, these are really good attorneys that have been practicing for 45 plus years. And I don’t know whether they selected me, or I selected them. But there’s been a lot of other attorneys in between that didn’t do what they were saying that they were going to do. So I was talking about when I said –

 

Chip: I’ve had some bad ones too, man. Oh, 100%. I’ve had bad advice by attorneys. And actually, that’s why I have a group of attorneys that just tell me what the other people are trying to say. And they know their position too. I’m like, “Hey, I need you to give me a clear view of this guy, what he’s saying and doing for me.”

 

John: Right.

 

Chip: Right. Because man, I’ve picked bad attorneys in the past. I chose bad, I chose badly. And I didn’t have any review over dealing with it.

 

John: Right. And they don’t review. They –

 

Chip: They don’t review themselves. 

 

John: No, you don’t, you don’t – 

 

Chip: [inaudible 44:19].

 

John: Yeah, let’s see. Go online and go to a blog that reviews attorneys. Oh, wait, there isn’t one. Wonder why, wou know?

 

Chip: Well, I mean, just an individual opinion, man. You know, like attorneys, they’ll have this idea of how to approach a problem, or a subject, or a negotiation, right? If you’re purchasing a business or selling a business, I mean, all of these has different ideas. And it’s just like in a doctor, they say, get a second opinion. Same thing with a legal opinion, get a second opinion.

 

John: Right? They’re practicing. The doctor is a practice, which is a little frightening.

 

Chip: I never really put that together. 

 

John: Oh yeah. They’re practicing theory.

 

Chip: Your law practice, you keep, when are gonna stop practice? Can you do this shit for real?

 

John: Well, it’s all based on theory, right? That’s too funny, but yeah, you know, my point before was the number of lawyers, well, these are the number of people that might be unnecessary and unnecessarily creating more legal issues. Because that later they become legislators. And, you know, it’s just the number of bad people, I guess, scum rises, you know. And it’s not necessarily lawyers, but just people in general. And the people that latch on to something –

 

Chip: Hey man, I’m gonna say, again, I love my attorneys, [inaudible 45:41] lawyers.

 

John: No, and I love my attorneys too.

 

Chip: I’m just making my liability, my libel statements here.

 

John: I know you’re going to cut all this part out anyway. 

 

Chip: No, I try. No I try to like, let it roll, man. I try to let it roll. Because we were talking about pH and I mean, you know, attorneys are kind of like pH adjustment for life. Life problems.

 

John: Right. Or you’re already in acidic water and you don’t really know it, and they are the litmus test, you know? They are the piece of paper that they dip into the liquid you think she can swim around in, and they go, “Hey, guess what? It’s not acidic. It’s basic. You know that pool you see in the desert with a cattle skull? That’s a pH 10. You’re at 9. You need some help. You need a handout. You need some advice.”

 

Chip: Alright, so back to pH. I got one more pH question for you, John, Google of all things cannabis nutrition. Man, I tell people this all the time. Demand, there’s a huge range that cannabis can grow with pH, right? What do you think the limits are? At what point is there really starting to be problems?

 

John: You’re gonna have to talk to my attorney. No. You know, that’s a funny thing. You know, if you have a pH tester, and a meter one, that can test a pool of liquid, you can take a bunch of leaves, and squeeze the juice out of them and measure that. And you’ll be surprised what the pH is. The EC could be 10,000, because there’s a lot of activity in the plant. But the pH generally will be 6.5. 

 

Chip: Mhmm, no matter what. 

 

John: Yeah. 

 

Chip: Right. 

 

John: So the plant does, the plant is, it’s stuck in one place for life.

 

Chip: The plant is. But like, is the availability of nutrients that’s coming in at the root zone that’s the issue, though?

 

John: Well, you know, it’s a fluctuating pH.

 

Chip: See, you can’t ever just ask John a yes or no answer. See, I wanted a like, “Hmm. 4.2 and 9.0,” right?

 

John: Talk to my attorney.

 

Chip: Yeah, talk my attorney.

 

John: Yeah well, if you look at the pH availability of all the nutrients that plants need, you see that they don’t line up anywhere. I mean, they kind of line up between 5.5 and say, 6.5. But ones, some have to be really low. Like, you know, one of the most important ones, manganese. Manganese, the pH has to be 4 in order for the plant to pick it up. Well, how’s it going to do that? Well, the plant adjusts its own pH. So you know, when people want to be this pH perfect, they’re trying to be at 6 to 7, so that the plant has an easier time, going up to 7 to get certain elements, or down to 4 to get certain elements.

 

Chip: Right. You’re just in the middle, so it’s easier for the plant to go either way.

 

John: Right. Right, and be able to pick things up.

 

Chip: Mhmm. So – 

 

John: And that’s in the soil.

 

Chip: So the further ranges from neutral make it more difficult.

 

John: Yes.

 

Chip: Right. ‘Cause the plant, ’cause I’ve personally seen a 8.5, you know, I’ve seen 4.5, you know plants. And they might not be the healthiest, but they grow. The buds don’t get so dense, you know, they might not be the heaviest, right? But they grow.

 

John: Yeah. I mean, you don’t want to keep it at 4.5, or you don’t want to keep it at 8.5. And if a plant is vigorously growing, it can, if you can measure right at the root zone, if you can take a sample where you’ve got a pipe and you can plug it right where the root is, so you can pull it up intact, and then you test right where the root is, you’ll see that the plant is already adjusting one way or the other. But you know, I mean, I have a $6,000 Metzker pH meter in the lab. This is not something you’re gonna –

 

Chip: Carry around out into the field.

 

John: It’s under glass. We’re not glass, but –

 

Chip: Beep, beep, beep. Bring it over here, back it up. Back it up, back it up.

 

John: It has its own table, you know?

 

Chip: Well, I’m not sure if any of our listeners understand pH anymore after our ramblings today, John, but I hope so.

 

John: Yeah, well, I think we told them that they can pH adjust their water down to 6, aerate it, and pull out the potassium.

 

Chip: Now, there’s a great tip. That’s a great tip.

 

John: You have the calcium carbonate, and then they’re gonna save money on fertilizer. And the plant will use that water and that fertilizer better, and you saw it. You did it yourself. And that was your field test right there.

 

Chip: Yeah, I’m all about the anecdotal evidence.

 

John: Right. Yeah. Well, I’m a show me guy. 

 

Chip: Yeah, absolutely. 

 

John: Missouri’s a show me state.

 

Chip: One state over.

 

John: Right. 

 

Chip: Yeah, totally. Well, and we also talked about a couple mechanisms to adjust the pH, right? 

 

John: Use nitric acid.

 

Chip: And, use nitric acid and there’s phosphoric acid. All the tomato growers, they’re on the sulfuric acid, you know. I think because you only have to put a little bit in or it’s so  cheap, or I’m not really sure. I’ve never used it myself.

 

John: Yeah, well, I mean, it depends. The tomato growers that are using it in greenhouses, and they’re still growing in soil. They’re doing off cycle of calcium feeding. So they have a doser system set up so that they’re feeding calcium. And that’s not being, that water isn’t being adjusted. 

 

Chip: Right.

 

John: And then if they’re in soil doing that on a big scale, they’ve already put a lot of calcium, like, you know, some kind of oyster shell or something in the soil.

 

Chip: So, last big question. Do I have to pH is I’m all organic? I’m container growing and all organic, do I have to pH?

 

John: Yeah, organic has a broad range of things, right? You know, if you’re using –

 

Chip: Thumb water only, and all my organic nutrition is in the soil.

 

John: Okay, that’s a good one. Because you know, some people do living soil beds, and they want to use all amendments, and keep it steady like that. So then you would pH adjust the water if it’s too high. And you’re going to benefit from that, because you won’t have calcium bicarbonate going into the soil, and stabilizing and keeping the pH too high. Because remember, you’re growing cannabis. So you want quality flower. So you have to be able to pull up manganese, iron and calcium, even though you’re putting in calcium, bicarbonate, it’s not available to the plant.

 

Chip: Right. So you’re saying for the water only growers, we need to adjust our pH.

 

John: Right. Well, that’s why I developed over the last couple of years a plant-based organic grow and an organic bloom.

 

Chip: Oh, Accent. Great, great product, we used a bunch this summer.

 

John: You can use, it’s CCF certified, and also the calcium that you would use be Plant Amp and that automatically lowers your pH because of the organic acids. So you put that first in a doser, and then the grow or the bloom after that. And you can mix the calcium and the magnesium together temporarily. And that’s the magnesium is also biochelated. It doesn’t have as much assets in it, so it won’t affect. It’s easier to chelate the magnesium than it is to chelate the calcium. Calcium is very, very difficult to get into a plant, but super essential. All the other nutrients go over the back of calcium into the plant. So you know, we did it so that that living bed people can use very little of it. And people that are growing in coco would use a lot more of it. So once again, you are pH adjusting, but using Plant Amp to do that.

 

Chip: Awesome, man. Well, thanks once again for an incredible episode of The Real Dirt. I’m stoked to see you in town so much. Now you’re going to come back here in a few weeks. We should do this again. 

 

John: We should.

 

Chip: This is like your regular stop. What John sees in Oklahoma.

 

John: Good things.

 

Chip: Good things, good things. Hey, listeners. Thanks for joining us once again for another episode of The Real Dirt with Chip Baker and John Piccirilli. Hey, if you haven’t done it already, please download all of our episodes. Please subscribe on iTunes, on Amazon, on Spotify, on any way you get podcasts. You can subscribe to The Real Dirt with Chip Baker. You can also check us out at any one of our operations, growerscoco.com, cultivatecolorado.com, cultivateokc.com, cultivategardensupply.com. We do it all, right? And check John out at cutting edgesolutions.com.

 

John: Thank you.

 

Chip: Yeah, it’s been a been a great episode, and I didn’t say it when we started this episode, so I’ll say it now. Why don’t you guys sit back and roll the largest joint you can and think about this episode of The Real Dirt?

Low Stress Training vs High Stress Training Cannabis

Low Stress Training vs High Stress Training Cannabis

Using low stress training and high stress training to increase cannabis yields

Stress training is a very effective way to get more out of your plants.

For most growers stress training is a way to increase yields. However if you’re growing indoors and have limited space you could see yourself using stress training to prevent your plants to outgrowing your space too.

What is stress training?

Stress training involves putting your plants through specific forms of stress, so that they produce a specific response. For example, if your plants naturally grow tall, you can train them to grow outward instead of upward.

When it comes to yields, some plants may divert most of their energy to one central flower, while smaller bracts are ignored over time. With stress training you can force your plants to divert energy more evenly for more flower sites and inevitably more yields.

There are two different forms of stress training for plants, low stress training and high stress training. It goes without saying that these two methods will produce different results, but you can achieve the same goals with both.

Low stress training

While it may take more time to see results compared to high stress training, low stress training is still a highly effective (and the most common) way to take control of your plants.

A common form of LST would be de-leafing. By removing smaller leaves on the plant that aren’t directly attached to a flower site, your plant will take that energy and focus it elsewhere, and without leaves to take it, it goes right into your flowers. Less leaves also means that light will be able to hit more of your plant.

Another LST method is tying plants down. Using ties or wire designed specifically for plants, you can tie down branches that keep growing upward so they train themselves to grow outward instead.

As you can see with both of these LST techniques, you aren’t damaging the plant or modifying in any extreme way. The results of these techniques will take longer to appear, but will work just as effectively as other high stress training methods.

High stress training

High stress training, while more impactful, is also more risky. Certain plants can only take so much stress and knowing what your plant can handle is essential before you go and start cutting the top off, which is one common high stress training method.

Topping your plant is when you cut off the the top of the main stem of your plant. While it sounds extreme it is highly effective at creating new nodes and flower sites. Topping can be done from the time you transplant a clone up until the first couple week of flower.

Super cropping is another high stress training technique that utilizes stem mutilation to decrease the height of the plant and stimulate growth. The goal of super cropping is to break down the inner fibers of the branch so that the stalk becomes pliable and can be trained into another position, all without harming the outside of the stem in the process.

Compared to low stress training, high stress training is more risk for more reward so to speak.

Is stress training cannabis essential?

The short answer is no. If plants were designed to be broken, shortened, tied down, we wouldn’t have to do it. Any plant will grow just fine without any sort of training.

However for experienced growers that want more out of their plants, using any sort of training technique will help keep your plant under control, increase yields, save space and more benefits when done correctly.

Freezing Your Cannabis: Storing cannabis correctly

Freezing Your Cannabis: Storing cannabis correctly

How to store marijuana properly
Unless you’re making fresh-frozen concentrates, putting your cannabis in the freezer might not be the best idea.
The cannabis plant is full of wonder and a plethora of yet-to-be discovered health benefits in addition to those already helping those ailing from a multiplicity of ailments. However, when it comes to recreational cannabis, people tend to forget that it is a plant just like any other, and after it is harvested it can only stay good for so long.

When it comes to storing your cannabis, there are different options you can try out to see what maintains the flavor and scent profile the best. But not all storage methods will provide the right humidity, temperature and lighting to maintain those tastes and smells for an extended period of time.

Cannabis Storing Basics

Storing cannabis is extremely simple and easy once you know the basics. The most important thing to remember is that cannabis likes the dark and cooler temperatures after it is cured. Mildew and other molds start to thrive on cannabis if the plant matter exceeds 77º and excessive dry heat will dry out the essential oils in the plant making it dry, crumbly, and harsher to consume.

While too low of a temperature can also be dangerous for cannabis potency, a nice cool temperature between 50º and 60º in a dark place and relative humidity between 59% and 63% that blocks UV rays will be the most effective in maintaining the original potency and flavor of cannabis. So, what is the most effective way to store cannabis?

Freezing Your Cannabis

Let’s start with freezing cannabis. In short, this is not the way to go. While one may think that freezing cannabis could have its perks like slowing down the aging process or helping the buds stay firm, it is actually the opposite. 

Most cannabis is “aged” for multiple days after the harvest to dry out and cure the buds, so by the time it hits the shelves it is already cured and ready to use. However, as cannabis sits, it continues to decarboxylate, which is the process that transfers THC-A into the psychoactive THC we all know and love. Lower temperatures like that of a freezer will slow down if not halt completely the decarboxylation process, leading to less potent cannabis over time.

Another downside to freezing cannabis is the fragility of the THC crystals that sit on the outside of the buds, also known as trichomes, one of the main contributors to the potency of cannabis. As temperatures drop, trichomes will freeze and fall off, decreasing potency. However, freezing cannabis can be useful for making concentrates such as ice-bubble hash or other concentrates made from frozen cannabis product.

Other Storage Methods

While it may seem obvious that storing cannabis in a plastic bag or a cardboard box is not an effective method of storage, many do so due to lack of knowledge of the effects over time. Have you ever noticed when you go to take your cannabis out of the plastic baggy it came in there’s little pieces of it sticking to the sides? That’s because plastic can hold a static charge that attracts trichomes, taking away potency every time you take it out and put it back.

The refrigerator may seem like a viable option since it is much warmer than a freezer but still cooler than 77º, but fluctuations in humidity and temperature from opening the fridge constantly can still increase chances of mold and mildew. 

The most effective way to store cannabis and maintain its flavor and aroma profiles over time is to store it in an airtight container, like a glass jar. While oxygen is essential for the curing process, you want just the right amount in your storage container to keep humidity consistent without drying out the bud too quickly.

If you want to go the extra mile, pick up a hygrometer to monitor humidity levels in your storage container and make sure the jar you are using is vacuum sealed to reduce exposure to oxygen. Also remember to keep your cannabis in a separate container from grinders, pipes or other paraphernalia as the smell of burnt cannabis and other resins can stick to the container making it stink over time.

Overall, as long as you have a glass jar kept it in a dark place that is relatively cool, you don’t have to worry about your cannabis going bad anytime soon!

The Best Tips for Breeding Cannabis

The Best Tips for Breeding Cannabis

professional cannabis growers on breeding cannabis

Breeding cannabis is a science that takes a lot of patience and knowledge of the plant.

If breeding cannabis was easy, every grower would be doing it and pumping out the next hot strain. But the truth is that breeding cannabis is a long, time-consuming process that has no guarantees. What does that mean?

You can pop 100 seeds, and not find a single plant that you want to keep. If that’s the case, you probably have bad genetics. In most cases though you may still only find a couple keepers.

Freaux from Jive Cannabis Co. in Oklahoma is all too familiar with the struggles of breeding cannabis. Jive grows some of the best cannabis available in the state, and they didn’t get there by taking other grower’s clones. Working with top-tier breeders like Dungeon Vault Genetics, Jive breeds new cannabis strains by crossing their own in-house varieties with the best of the cannabis genetics community.

Breeding Cannabis in Greenhouses

When it comes to breeding cannabis, having control over your environment is a key factor to getting the results you want. In a greenhouse, it takes more due diligence to still grow high quality cannabis. But with a strong design and consistent maintenance a greenhouse can produce cannabis comparable to indoor.

“Oklahoma is a difficult, difficult place to grow cannabis. We try to fail as many ways as possible, so we’ll know how not to do it. But man, these greenhouses, these hoop houses like this, this technology if you know how to run it right, and can play it like an instrument, because this is just a passive greenhouse and you can open up the sidewalls and open up the ends.” – Chip Baker

During this interview with Freaux, Chip and him were wandering through the greenhouses on Chip’s farm checking out all of the cannabis. Some of the greenhouses were full of clones, others full of seed plants, and others with both. But Freaux was consistently surprised by the quality. “I walked down and was looking at some of the different phenos. Man it just seems like every one looks better than the last,” he said.

Tips for Cannabis Breeding

Remember when we mentioned how some growers might pop 100 seeds and pull out a couple winners? The truth is, if you want to get a real strong idea of how many genetic variations a plant might have, you’ll want to plant a lot more.

“If you have a bit of space to plant as many as possible, I think they say it’s something like 2,000 seeds is where you’re gonna see how many genetic variations are actually in that. So as far as you can, you know, go into that, I mean, obviously, you can’t always plant 2000 seeds or whatnot. But the more the merrier, because you really want to give a good look at what’s actually out there.” – Freaux

Of course Freaux knows that not many people can or even want to plant out 2,000 seeds just to find a few of the best. For the average grower, he recommends popping just a couple packs. Since seeds typically come in 10-12 packs, it’s a good starting point for anybody trying to get into cannabis breeding. Another key tip is to plant all of the seeds in your pack, not just a couple.

Planting just a couple seeds won’t show you the full diversity of the seeds, and if you grow one plant that looks good you might think that the other seeds will grow the same. However you might end up planting the other seeds in the pack later on and realize one of them is better, and you wasted a bunch of time cutting clones from the first plant.

After you pick out a few plants that look like they’re performing well, there’s several factors you want to consider before you move on to the next step which would be taking a clone.

“Did it grow right? How was it?  What was the overall you know, smoke? Was it, did it smell good, taste good?  You know was it easier to grow, was it friendly? You know, all those little like, factors you’re looking at.” – Freaux

The Second and Third Run

After picking out your top performers, you will want to do a second run of the plant. A second run is just the second time growing out a plant, usually from clone, in order to see how the plant develops when it isn’t growing from seed. For Freaux, any plant that is getting a second run is likely a plant that will move on to become a full-production strain, i.e. a strain that is going to end up on a dispensary menu.

Freaux’s second run is the time when he grows out the mother plants and takes clones. Once these plants are fully developed, they enter the “third run”, where the plants are harvested, dried and sent out to dispensaries for patients. After that, it will be the consumer who determines if Jive Cannabis Co. keeps the strain.

For Chip, he’s been testing out some different methods for his second runs.

“I’m starting to transition though to like, a different program which is, plant the seed out and grow it enough to take a clone. Take the clone and throw the seed away. Veg the plant for a small amount of time, a couple weeks and flower, right? As many plants as you can, tend the area and to see all the pheno expressions. And then from that run, make my big cut.” – Chip Baker

Chip admits that this method might take a little more time which commercial growers may not be able to afford, but his method works for him on his farm.

Mothering Seed Plants

A debate you might not have known about in the cannabis breeding community is whether or not plants grown from seed should be used as mothers. Chip’s preference is to use clones instead.

“They don’t produce mothers as well as clone plants do. I don’t believe so much in the multi-generational thing, because I know cuttings that are 20 to 30 years old, and they still grow bomb weed. But you know, we, all of our mothers are just within a couple of years old and you know, one or two generations off the seed plant.” – Chip Baker

In his experience, Chip says that seed plants grow noticeably different from clone plants. The main difference Chip notices is that plants from seed have more symmetrical growth and their nodes grow directly across from each other. With clones, the nodes alternate with each other. Due to this difference alone Chip could tell a difference in production.

Some Final Advice

This episode of The Real Dirt was meant to be just that, an episode! However, when you try to record an episode outside, while walking through hundreds of cannabis plants, you don’t end up with the best quality recording…

Since most of the episode mainly consisted of Chip and Freaux checking out some super dank weed, here’s Chip’s advice for growing some great “organ-ish” cannabis yourself:

“If you want great, ‘organ-ish’ weed, get your plant established and growing using three-part Cutting Edge and like, a four inch pot. When you transplant it into your forever pot that’s got other organic nutrients in it, water it once or twice with Cutting Edge synthetic nutrients. Once at the start of flower, once at the end of the stretch. And man, you’ll have great huge, incredible tasting, not purely organic, but organ-ish versions. And then all the other waterings, use organic. But just like, two synthetic waterings, establish the plant with the Cutting Edge and man, that grows great organ-ish weed, for sure.” – Chip Baker

Toward the end of the tour, Freaux had seen all of Chip’s greenhouses and was seriously impressed with how the plants looked compared to your average indoor.

“I mean, if people could just see how happy these plants are out here, man. You know, I don’t have much experience. I don’t have any experience growing outdoor in this type of setting. But just to see I mean, I literally look like I’m looking at somebody’s indoor garden with the quality, so it’s crazy. The plants are absolutely loving it out here for sure.” – Freaux

The rest of this episode has been lost to the wind…literally. It was so windy we couldn’t make out the rest of the recording! Check out the transcript from what we were able to pull to get some more cannabis breeding tips, see what strains Chip has on the farm, which ones Freaux loves and more!

Transcript

Chip:  Alright, here we are. Here we are. Here we are.

 

Freaux:  Hey, what’s going on? So I have –

 

Chip:  What do you got there, man?

 

Freaux:  Man, I got Purple Gelato. I’ve got Hot Rod, and I’ve got mixed Cream Cake, which is Ice Cream Cake times Cusherman’s Purple Gelato. So out of 33 times Purple Vapor and then Hot Rods, Motorbreath 15 times Grandpa’s Breath.

 

Chip:  Wow, this is gonna be a really good episode of The Real Dirt with Chip: Baker. And today on Chip: Baker and The Real Dirt, we have Freaux: from Jive. Thanks for coming. 

 

Freaux:  [inaudible 00:44]

 

Chip:  Hey, man, let’s get into some of that weed.

 

Freaux:  Cool. Any one you want to try first?

 

Chip:  Let’s – show me the jars. Let’s see it. Let’s see it. What do we got? We got – this is Purple Gelato. This is Ice Cream Cake.

 

Freaux:  [inaudible 01:00-01:04]

 

Chip:  Oh, man. So where did all these come from?

 

Freaux:  Alright. So, the Purple Gelato and Hot Rod is [inaudible 1:12] Genetics. Those are actually his breeder cuts. The – I think a Cushman is just actually a pheno hunt that we went on at Jive.

 

Chip:  Okay, alright. And where did that genetic come from?

 

Freaux:  That’s Seed Junky.

 

Chip:  Seed Junky. 

 

Freaux:  Seed Junky, yeah.

 

Chip:  Okay. Alright. Awesome. Yeah, let’s check it out. Ice Cream Cake. Nose test, that’s pretty good. Pungent. It’s good. Right? It’s a kind of very what I’d expect.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, it’s what you expect. Kind of like, Gelato notes like, a little like, minty with the Cushmans. 

 

Chip:  Hot Rod.

 

Freaux:  It’s got that Motorbreath and the Grandpa’s Breath. It’s a little chemi to it, little chemi gas. Super heavy.

 

Chip:  It’s delicate, it has as a delicate aroma. And it smells of  Chemdog gas.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, exactly.

 

Chip:  Lineage breath. Oh man. Now, that one, that one’s pretty good. The Purple Gelato is really gonna have to do better than the Hot Rod for me to choose it first. Hold on. Let me, let me check the Purple Gelato. Wow, man. The Purple Gelato looks phenomenal.

 

Freaux:  That deals off the charts I mentioned.

 

Chip:  Oh, dude, look at this, man. This looks like it’s great. Look at that super purple leaf on it. Oh my god. There’s one little leaf in the hole. Don’t even look real, man. Oh my god.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, that’s a special one. That’s one of my personal favorites right now.

 

Chip:  Man. This looks great. And I’m sure it’s probably one of the best sellers. I’m gonna go for the Hot Rod, though.

 

Freaux:  Hot Rod? Okay.

 

Chip:  You came out on a windy day here. Thanks for coming out, man.

 

Freaux:  I appreciate you having me like always.

 

Chip:  Yeah, we’re just at the end of our harvest season here. It’s November 2020. We’ve had a great year despite COVID. This is our third greenhouse pull out of here, this year. I think you’ve seen most of them.

 

Freaux:  I have, man. I tell you what, it looks beautiful out here. All these varieties and the way it looks. This is, man.

 

Chip:  This runs fucking great.

 

Freaux:  That’s what I’ve seen, too.

 

Chip:  Oh yeah, man.

 

Freaux:  It looks awesome, man. What are we looking at here? This is –

 

Chip:  Tangie.

 

Freaux:  Tangie and Do-Si. I tell you what, there’s some absolute beautiful phenos in here. Man, I honestly, to tell you the truth, I don’t have a lot of experience looking at you know, weed growing outdoor. But this is killer, man. I mean this, trichomes – 

 

Chip:  It don’t look like the normal outdoor weed, does it?

 

Freaux:  It does not look like total outdoor weed. I mean, honestly, if you had this plant, brought it indoors you would have, I mean, it looks like some indoor to me, man. Honestly, especially some of the phenos.

 

Chip:  Sometimes it looks better than our indoor even, man. I mean, it’s when you hit it right in these greenhouses man, it’s just, it’s better than indoor. The flavor is better. The overall yield is better. The individual, the density might not be as there. The pounds will be larger. The cost of production, the man – that shit’s hard, dude. It ain’t easy.

 

Freaux:  No, I mean, I can only imagine. I mean, just looking at what y’all have going on out here, looks like a ton of work. What I’m surprised is just looking at it the outdoors, it’s just how fat these colas are. I mean, these colas are crazy fat. I mean, super crystally, lot of good color. I mean, it just looks beautiful. Y’all killed this round man.

 

Chip:  Yeah, the glands are swelling right now. It’s really starting to give that indoor appearance. And you can tell the difference between our indoor and this, but most people can’t.

 

Freaux:  No, to the average eye, if you pulled this plant and threw it under a light just for, you know, to kind of trick somebody or whatever I mean, this easily looks like some indoor weed.

 

Chip:  Well, I mean, honestly, we are inside right now, aren’t we?

 

Freaux:  Yeah, we’re in like a –

 

Chip:  Yeah, we’re in a hoop house. This is, there’s walls and a roof. It’s kind of indoors, isn’t it?

 

Freaux:  Yeah. Theoretically. Theoretically, yeah.

 

Chip:  We walked inside the greenhouse.

 

Freaux:  [inaudible 5:35]

 

Chip:  If there was a door here, we would have walked in the door.

 

Freaux:  You’re absolutely right.

 

Chip:  But it’s growing by the sun. Yeah, that’s what we mean by outdoor though. I’m just bullshitting. But like, I’m proud to call this outdoor. I’m just always testing the boundaries of what’s what, you know. What people consider what is, and we’ve had some poor quality outdoor, I’ll show you that a little later on too. Oklahoma is a difficult, difficult place to grow cannabis. We try to fail as many ways as possible, so we’ll know how not to do it. But man, these greenhouses, these hoop houses like this, this technology if you know how to run it right, and can play it like an instrument, because this is just a passive greenhouse and you can open up the sidewalls and open up the ends. There’s generally not electricity in here. But if you play it right, it sounds beautiful and you can have some beautiful product in it. But man, if you can’t play it right, if you can’t ven it right, if you know, you can’t work the passive nature of it. It’s often too hot, too humid, right, you know? And just the quality goes down.

 

Freaux:  I’m seeing this round man. I mean, it’s amazing. I mean I’m, you know, kind of walking in and looking around before you got out here. Kind of walked down and was looking at some of the different phenos. Man it just seems like every one looks better than the other. I mean – 

 

Chip:  Yeah, we’ll take a look at all of them a little later on.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, I mean, this Tangie Do-Si is really expressing itself well. Put my nose on a couple of phenos [inaudible 7:17] kind of lean more toward the Do-Si side, some more toward the Tangie, some that are kind of right there in the middle, have a good balance of both. I’ve seen some that are, you know, showing real purple. But I think overall, I think looking at all of the plants, it’s just the, man, the trichome production and the frost. Every one of these phenos is frosted out.

 

Chip:  Yeah, absolutely.

 

Freaux:  I mean this, I don’t know what I’m looking at. It looks like a couple hundred.

 

Chip:  There’s 250.

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  250 seed plants here. We veg them for, planted them in four inch pots, vegged them for 23 days, transplanted them in these five gallon pots, and they were flowered immediately.

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  Right. And look how tall some of these guys are, right?

 

Freaux:  Yeah, some of them are huge. I mean, everything looks beautiful in here, man. It’d be hard to man, it’d be hard to pick a winner. There’s so many to go through. But like, as I was walking down the road, I mean, it’s just one after the other showing, you know, different characteristics. The smells, the looks. Tell you what. everything in here looks ultra happy too.

 

Chip:  What do you think about it? Good times here. Good times. Yeah, man. You know, I’ve always really been fascinated with Rastafari and religion. You know, primarily because they worship cannabis or it’s part of their sacrament, you know. I guess they worship God and Haile Selassie and some other stuff too, but, you know, they’re really into weed. So you know, I researched them. And one of the things I’ve really loved about the Rastas is they almost always have their own joint. And they’re large joints too, they’re not small joints. And in this time of COVID, I think this is the perfect time for us all to switch to these extra large papers. What size are these papers?

 

Freaux:  They’re called king size.

 

Chip:  King size papers. Everybody, if you’re sitting back right now, go to your cupboard and get some king size papers. And you know, about two grams of weed. If you don’t have that, just press pause right now, and go to the local store and get it, and we’ll wait for you to get back. Alright, now that you’re back, let’s grind that weed up and roll it into the largest possible joint you can, like me and Freaux are doing. And you know, we’ll just all smoke one together. So I’ll give you all a second just to put it together as we’re twisting it up. You know, always fascinated with different people’s rolling techniques. Freaux seems like to be a master here. He brought his own papers into –

 

Freaux:  I’m not huge on the organics. I kind of like the classics just because it’s a little bit easier to roll. 

 

Chip:  No, I like the classics too. We just ran out. Could I have one of those? Yeah, they roll far better. 

 

Freaux:  Yeah, exactly.

 

Chip:  I am a professional roller, that’s for sure.

 

Freaux:  I’m still over here put it in the [inaudible 11:14], start smoking it.

 

Chip:  You know the faster you get to roll joints, the more you get to smoke them throughout the day. See, I can smoke like five times more than you right now.

 

Freaux:  You rolled another three in the amount of time – 

 

Chip:  Alright. Alright, well, hey, we’ll just take a break. We’ll walk inside to our into our medical consumption area. So we can legally consume these, the medication they call it. Actually this is just like, quality control for us right now. You know, Freaux often needs my expert opinion on how good his weed is, you know?

 

Freaux:  Yeah, I tell you what, anybody that I want to give my honest opinion is you, Chip:.

 

Chip:  Nah hey, I’ll give it to you man, that’s for sure. Alright, and we’ll just, we’ll just walk inside. Alright, now that we’re inside. The Hot Rod. Now, I love the bud structure in the Hot Rod. Do you think that’s why they call it the Hot Rod?

 

Freaux:  I think you probably call it the Hot Rod because of like, the gassy nose. But –

 

Chip:  Fuel. The fuel reference, okay, okay. It looks like it’s a grower though, man. There’s some nice nuggets in there, huh?

 

Freaux:  Yeah, the Hot Rod is definitely a grower, big, fat crystallized nuggets. I know DVG always says for the gas heads this is a strain, God’s hands rejoice at this strain.

 

Chip:  Oh, this one’s great. And this is Seed Junky.

 

Freaux:  No this is a DVG, Dungeon Vault Genetics.

 

Chip:  Dungeon Vault Genetics. Dungeon Vault Genetics. Oh man, this looks like a great one. Has a barrel, very soft taste. Like you could smoke this weed all day. There’s good flavor.  Don’t get me wrong when I say soft, but it’s, the opposite of soft will be harsh or hard. Right

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  Right? 

 

Freaux:  I wouldn’t want them to be harsh.

 

Chip:  Yeah, yeah.  That’s a hard smoke. Yeah, you don’t want that, right?

 

Freaux:  It’s definitely very smooth. As far as like, the high, we haven’t got all the way like smoking it. And it’s pretty heavy. I’d say definitely can smoke it during the day. I mean, if just depending on how much you smoke. It does have a, you know it can knock you out, though if you’re not careful, if you overdo it. But I do start my day on the Hot Rod sometimes but for me personally, I kind of like to keep toward the end of the day. But when you do got to get medicated, this is the one that’s gonna do the trick.

 

Chip:  No, this is great, man. This fits excellent in our medication lounge here. What do you think about this little place? Little indoor, outdoor medication lounge?

 

Freaux:  I think it’s awesome man. I mean every facility needs to have something like this man, you know?

 

Chip:  Yeah well with the laws, you have to separate it all. And so that’s what we try to do is separate it.

 

Freaux:  No, I hear you on that. Yeah, it’s a cool little spot, you know?

 

Chip:  Oh yeah, man sitting on the back porch with Freaux, this is The Real Dirt. Yeah, you know, one of the reasons I had you over here Freaux is ’cause you know, you love to pheno hunt, you love to plant seeds. That’s kind of how we met Jacob. I mean, you’ve been a customer of ours at Cultivate OKC from the beginning. But Jacob Sarabia that handles our commercial sales, he mentioned you, that you were down here and you bought seeds, and you were into genetics. And so that’s kind of how we linked up initially. 

 

Freaux:  Oh yeah, definitely.

 

Chip:  Right? It takes people that are really into it, you know? You see lots of people plant seeds. And they’ll go buy the six pack or a 10 pack, and they’ll plant two or three, and then they’ll pick that, that one plant that’s, you know, out of the two or three. Let’s talk about why there’s a better way to do it, how there’s a better way to do it.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, I mean so like, whatever kind of like, space you have or whatnot, I want to say like, the science behind it, you need to you know, if you have this bit of space to plant as many as possible, I think they say it something where 2000 seeds is where you’re gonna get, like a, an actual, like, shows you exactly how many genetic variations are actually in that. So as far as you can, you know, go into that, I mean, obviously, you can’t always plant 2000 seeds or whatnot. But the more the merrier, because you really want to give a good look at what’s actually out there. You know, you’re gonna –

 

Chip:  I mean, I try to at least plant packs, though. You gotta at least plant a pack or, and I mean, if you can, multiple packs, right?

 

Freaux:  There’s no way that I would just plant one or two seeds out of a pack, I would definitely not do that. You know, a pack, which is like 10 to 12 is like a good starting point. I mean if you can run about two or three of them, I think that’s a pretty nice, you know, run. You know, just depending on the genetics or whatnot, I mean, you can get lucky sometimes finding stuff and, you know, planting less than that. But, I would say if you are going to go ahead and actually take the time and effort and you know, all the work that goes into pheno hunting, that you’d want to have, you know, as many as you possibly can, but definitely more than just like, one or two out of a pack. Because there’s so many different genetic variations when you’re looking at phenos. And you want to have as many options as you can when you’re actually looking at it

 

Chip:  And just to see it to learn it, right?

 

Freaux:  Yeah, just to see it to learn it. And then, because as you start planting seeds, and you get to look at, you know, different variations in the genetics, you can see how much different they are than the other. If you’re only planning like one or two, you’re not going to really see anything at that point. I would definitely recommend to anybody who’s either starting out on it or whatnot to at least plant that full pack, or one or two, if you can. I know some people too –

 

Chip:  It’s hard ’cause it’s expensive and people look at as like, “Oh, man, these are $80 packs and $200 packs,” right? And that’s how people look at it, but they got to look at it by seed and how much that seed could potentially produce for them.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, I mean, if you’re looking, I mean –

 

Chip:  Hey, let’s pick one of the plants you’ve planted a pack of seeds of this year that you’ve kept, because you’ve done that, right?

 

Freaux:  Yeah, we definitely have. 

 

Chip:  Just like, pick a random plant.

 

Freaux:  Let’s say the Ice Cream Cake Cushman.

 

Chip:  The Ice Cream Cake Cushman. So when did you plant that out?

 

Freaux:  Man I planted that probably, it would have been right after the Oklahoma Cannabis Cup. So well over a year ago.

 

Chip:  Okay, over a year ago, you bought that pack for 150 bucks, or..? 

 

Freaux:  I think that particular pack was like, 200.

 

Chip:  So you bought $200, you planted that pack, and you’ve had how many runs of cuttings off that since then? Two or three at least?

 

Freaux:  Roughly three.

 

Chip:  Right. So you’ve had three runs of cuttings off that initial investment of $200.

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  Wow, that’s when it starts to make sense, right? If you think about all the pounds that have been able to grow, or all the plants that have been able to grown, 200 bucks is nothing for like, a great pack of seeds. And you got it with that too. I mean, you know, we’ve planted out other seeds where you haven’t got anything. I mean, I have. I know you have too.

 

Freaux:  That happens all the time.

 

Chip:  That’s most of the case, right?

 

Freaux:  [inaudible 19:18-19:21] find anything just because you find a female and [inaudible 19:26] really like a winner you need to grow it out and maybe run it one or you know, another time or two to actually see if it is you know, something that you’re gonna wanna keep. But yeah, if you’re talking about it from like an investment, I would look at it to 200 bucks to have your own specific strain pheno that nobody else has is well, well worth your money.

 

Chip:  Well worth the money.

 

Freaux:  Well worth the money. 

 

Chip:  Absolutely. But it’s not a guaranteed gamble though, is it?

 

Freaux:  [inaudible 19:57-20:05].

 

Chip:  I would say, let’s see. We have four strains in the 13 that we sell at Baker’s, that my wife has at her genetics dispensary in Oklahoma City, Baker’s Medical. I believe the four of them came from seeds that we planted in the past two years. And the rest of them were cell cultures, right? Or cuttings people gave us. In that same period of time, we have planted dozens of packs of seeds that we hadn’t decided the weed was worth anything.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, I mean, like we were saying earlier, it doesn’t always work out. I mean, especially too if you have like, a good lineup, which I know y’all do. You don’t want to, you know, digress from that. [inaudible 21:02] opinion – 

 

Chip:  You gotta be heartless, you got to throw it away.

 

Freaux:  You really do. And then the thing is I know, you know, I know a lot of people. You put a lot of time and effort into it, and you really want to get something out of it. But I mean, it’s either got to have it or not, and you got to kind of have the, you know, the know how or, you know, the profile as far as like, what you’re actually looking for. Because a lot of people you know, it gives genetics a bad name, when you know, you get a pack of seeds and you can easily tell like, “Hey,” you know, “that’s not a winner. That’s not gonna make the cut,” but you still continue to run it and put it out there in the market. And it just kind of like, weakens the gene pool. And then on top of that too, there’s some really good genetics out there that people just got to get in there and find them. There’s a lot of good stuff in those pack of seeds. So if you know, you don’t find something, if there’s like –  I know it’s happened with me several times, where you get a specific cross you’re really excited about, and you run a pack of them which is roughly you know, 10 to 12 seeds or whatnot. You don’t find anything, get another pack. Try it again or you know if something that you were really, really interested in –  I know that’s happened you know, with us at Jive even like, recently we had a pack that we ran, didn’t really find anything. And the cross was really, really you know, appealing to everybody. We ran another pack and it’s kind of to be determined you know, if it’s gonna make the cut or not. It could go [inaudible 22:23] too but –

 

Chip:  That’s the faith.

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  Right? You gotta believe.

 

Freaux:  You gotta believe. I mean you kind of [inaudible 22:30] right there.

 

Chip:  You have to believe.

 

Freaux:  You  do have to believe.

 

Chip:  I’ve kind of given that up with weed. And I don’t believe anymore at all. I actually come to it with like, “Oh, this is probably not gonna be great. And I’m gonna learn [inaudible 22:45-22:55].

 

Freaux:  Yeah, you know with that too. I know a lot of people or some people I know, they kind of start making like, cuts or selections on stuff before they’ve actually you know, either harvested or dried it.

 

Chip:  You run it. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. A lot of clone nurseries [inaudible 23:11] all over the country but specifically here in Oklahoma,  it’s [inaudible 23:19] period of time even not just one or two runs. [inaudible 23:25], how many runs?

 

Freaux:  So, I would say after two. But like, that third just for safe measure. But like, you know, at  Jive we like to give it basically you know, one run, the initial run. And that’s kind of the you know, the initial tell as far as like you know, is it gonna make it? Should I get a second one?

 

Chip:  Did it grow right?

 

Freaux:  Did it grow right? How was it?  What was the overall you know, smoke? Was it, did it smell good, taste good?  You know was it easier to grow, was a friendly? You know, all those little like, factors you’re looking at. But the second run is kind of the you know, the you know, cement it where, this is going to make the lineup. I’d say the second run is kind of where you’re gonna, you know, cement it as far as like, “This is gonna be in our lineup. This is gonna be in our menu.” And then the third time for us would kind of be when you have enough of it, you’ve built up you know, your moms and your clones. And then the third time where it kind of be the grand finale where you’d be able to drop it to the patients. And then you know, see you know, how it reacts or whatnot, as far as like, you know, “Well, we liked it. Does everybody else like it?” You know what I’m saying?

 

Chip:  Damn. No, that’s a great way to look at it. We do it’s very similar, but for different reasons. And it’s if we grow it from seed, we just grow it and see if we like the way it grows. I’m starting to transition though to like, a different program which is, plant the seed out and grow it enough to take a clone. Take the clone or to throw the seed away. Veg the plant for a small amount of time, a couple weeks and flower, right? As many plants as you can, attend area and to see all the pheno expressions. And then from that run, make my big cut. Right? And all the way through it, it takes a little more commitment and time. I don’t think you turnaround quite as quick?

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  But if you’re keeping it in commercial production, it might not be the best way to go. But, man, it’s a little easier, you know? For me anyway.

 

Freaux:  And I would say too, I know me and you have kind of talked about this before. That second time, when you actually do take the cutting, and then you, you know, you run it out a second time, you’re gonna get a little bit better expression to see like, what’s actually going to like, happen with it. And I know the last time we talked about it, you had kind of had mentioned that and I guess I really didn’t think about it, because you know, you’re more or less thinking, you know, I want to get it in and get into the rotation and stuff like that. But that second run, when you actually do take a cut and go from there kind of really solidifies it as far like –

 

Chip:  It acts like the third run.

 

Freaux:  It really does, you know.

 

Chip:  It really does.

 

Freaux:  And I would say there’s a much bigger difference between the first and the second, than there is from like, the second and third. The third run’s almost just kind of, you know, ramping it up or whatnot to actually make the menu or cut or what.

 

Chip:  It’s just the guts to throw away those plants.

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  And, you know, maybe give them away –

 

Freaux:  It’s hard –

 

Chip:  You know. But the seed plants, there’s a huge debate over it, but I prefer not to keep seed plants as mothers. They don’t produce mothers as well as clone plants do. I don’t believe so much in the multi-generational thing, because I know cuttings that are 20 to 30 years old, and they still grow bomb weed. But you know, we, all of our mothers are just within a couple of years old and you know, one or two generations off the seed plant. It’s the seeds, though, they just grow completely different. There’s a more of a symmetrical growth, the nodes grow directly across from each other, and then the clones, they grow alternate to each other. And the plants really produced differently because of that, and act differently because of that.

 

Freaux:  And then also too, just to kind of throw that in there, like, I know a lot of people grow from seed, they might not, you know, work or train with their plants, as much as it were to see, like, you know, does it top well? Does it, you know, ven well? How does it you know, perform in kind of like a setting with like, other stuff. Whereas that second run, when you have you know, more you know, clippings, cuttings of it, you can really, you know, kind of train your plants to do what you want it to do into like, your program or whatnot. And I know, like, you know, the initial run of the seeds you’re just kind of seeing, is it good? Is it worth it? But that second run is really like, you know, is it going to make it or not? Because you’re vending it, you’re putting in a trellis, you’re staking it, you’re, you know, topping it, you really get to train it into your program, depending on, you know, what you would do or whatnot. And that second run, you know, is definitely the true, you know [inaudible 28:07-28:15].

 

Chip:  Like Fletcher, the guy I got these seeds from, he can probably see the plants different. I know he sees the plants differently than we do. It takes me two solid clone runs before I can really see the plant.

 

Freaux:  That makes total sense.

 

Chip:  Two. And part of that’s also is like, you know, the first run is I’m throwing stuff away. In my mind, I’m looking to throw stuff away. And in the second run, I’m wondering, like how the keepers are gonna perform. And so then there’s still another culling then, right? And and it’s really I guess it’s the third run that solidifes if I’ve got it or not. And by you know, starting with clone from that initial run, you do save a whole run. You know, you’re gonna go three runs. You do lose, 7, 40, 50 days.

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  So that’s what it costs.

 

Freaux:  Man, it’s worth it in the end though.

 

Chip:  Well, that’s what it costs too, because you’re gonna grow that and throw it away and it’s all worth nothing, right? The rest of it’s all for nothing.

 

Freaux:  I know what you mean.

 

Chip:  [inaudible 29:37-29:40]

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  That was fun weed man. Oh, man. Well hey, are you ready to go look at some weed? Let’s get up and go outside and go look at some weed.

 

Freaux:  Let’s do it.

 

Chip:  Alright. Alright, in a stroll through the garden  today with Freaux. Good to see you today, Freaux. So here it is, man. We got [inaudible 30:01] seeds, about the same time. We both ordered these seeds. I wanted to have you out. Well you didn’t quite get these seeds that we [inaudible 30:10] order and you got some seeds out of it. And so yeah, these are the, this is all Do-Si-Dos crosses from Archive. This room is all Tangie. Favorite phenos about [inaudible 30:34]. Let’s see, right here. I think this is – 

 

Freaux:  That smells good.

 

Chip:  [inaudible 30:40-30:42] 

 

Freaux:  That one’s a real big Do-Si there.

 

Chip:  Yeah, it’s sitting right next to this really quiet one. 

 

Freaux:  [inaudible 30:56].

 

Chip:  So interesting thing about this why, when – I forgot. This is a [inaudible 31:01].

 

Freaux:  That got a crazy nose.

 

Chip:  Hey, check this out, trellis. We’re planting these plants up. And one of my employees forgot to actually plant the plant. And, and it rooted in there. By the time we figured it out, we decided that we just leave it and see what happens. And so I just remembered the whole thing we just walked in here. And that’s what happened.

 

Freaux:  Man, you should run that one again. Just [inaudible 31:29] life right there.

 

Chip:  Yeah, totally. Totally. 

 

Freaux:  It’s crazy the way weed [inaudible 31:35-31:42]

 

Chip:  You know what I mean? I couldn’t like, help but wonder if like, if that was planted properly, would it look more like that plant to the left of it, you know?

 

Freaux:  Yeah, that’s a beautiful one back there. Look at all those colors.

 

Chip:  Yeah, that’s a that’s a good one too, man.

 

Freaux:  Color really came out on that one.

 

Chip:  Yeah. And when you, you know, we just stopped right at the beginning of the greenhouse. But when you look around, you kind of see the expression of phenotypes. And now we can like, walk down here and you can just pick out the kind of the ones you know, that are just right here. You’ve got this whiter one. You’ve got this one that’s going like, more purple, right? And then there’s the, this one here is like, a little leafier, it’s gonna definitely be bigger, go a little bit longer, right?

 

Freaux:  For sure.

 

Chip: More the Tangie looking.

 

Freaux:  Like you said, just right here in this small little spot right there. Man, if you I mean, the crystal production trichomes on that plant and that plant look wild, man.

 

Chip:  Yeah, man. It’s –

 

Freaux:  They look almost like, boom or whatnot. They look awesome. It’s crazy too.  If you can see right here, that one looks pretty much like that when these two are pretty much similar but different. And that one’s kind of [inaudible 33:05] right there.

 

Chip:  Yeah, absolutely. Alright. So structure on some of these are just incredible, man. I mean, you know, I mean, Fletcher really does do a great job at this. You could pick, someone could take this, you know, a six pack of this, and pick out one of all these different six plants here. They could pick any one, and it’d be great, great weed.

 

Freaux:  No, for sure. I mean, any one of these, you know, definitely will be incredible weed.

 

Chip:  But man, to get the best like, like alright, let’s play a game while we’re in here on the Tangies. We’ll start on the Tangies. And then let’s do it on the whole garden. Let’s pick up with that plant in here.

 

Freaux:  Alright, I don’t want [inaudible 33:58]. 

 

Chip:  200 plants here. That’s down to the end. 

 

Freaux:  Let’s do it.

 

Chip:  Alright, alright. So yeah, we just stroll through here looking for the girls. Alright, so we’re walking through the garden currently. Freaux, he’s feeling the stem. He’s caressing the top nugget, he’s smelling them gently, he’s looking at the structure. God, this is a really good plant right here, man. Just the plant, like, the  structure and size, you could tell that [inaudible 34:31].

 

Freaux:  Wow look at that one. Look at this one. That’s got a real good nose too. Man I think like you were saying earlier, they got some like clear cut like keynotes. You can almost see like, you know, like five different styles with obviously like, little variation of it but there’s some like, these green, fat ones or some more like, purple crystallized ones.

 

Chip:  But those white ones man. I want the white, fat ones is the one I’m looking for. 

 

Freaux:  No, I hear you.

 

Chip:  Right? Hey, and this one’s a good one. I mean just to stop and talk about this one. Like, it’s very, the colors [inaudible 35:21] really light. The nugget structure isincredible the top colas, you know it’s [inaudible the 35:30], pattern of it is really nice, has a secondary crown that grows you know, perfectly. This has a perfect shape to me.

 

Freaux:  No, that does have a really nice shape to it.

 

Chip:  But I mean I’m looking for it slightly better than that.

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  But I want, I like that bud structure.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, I’d say I like this structure right here too.

 

Chip:  Yeah, I mean –

 

Freaux:  [inaudible 35:56]

 

Chip:  See now that’s a, that is a perfect grower for a vertical grow right there. See a green grow, where you were literally just planting you know, plants and trying to flip them?

 

Freaux:  Yeah, it doesn’t have much.

 

Chip:  There’s not much branching and just straight up, you can bottom that off real easy. It’s actually has a real OG type of growth pattern, if you look at it.

 

Freaux:  It really does.

 

Chip:  Yeah, this is that Tangie side to it. [inaudible 36:26-36:31] mentioned on it, but – 

 

Freaux:  Has more of a Tangie to it than those two, for sure too.

 

Chip:  Oh, man, that one behind it, man. You see all of the braided, tight, swollen calluses on that one right there? I mean, wow.

 

Freaux:  Super pretty one.

 

Chip:  That’s a pretty one.

 

Freaux:  I mean, if you just keep going down, they just keep getting better and better.

 

Chip:  It’s hard to pick man. 

 

Freaux:  I can’t believe it man.

 

Chip:  Oh, I wish you [inaudible 37:01-37:08]

 

Freaux:  Man. This whole greenhouse, I mean, like you said, like you were saying, I mean, any one of these. I mean, obviously it hasn’t been, you know, smoked or anything yet or dried, but –

 

Chip:  Just purely on growth patterns.

 

Freaux:  Just looking at them. I mean, you know, what is somebody looking for? There’s, looks like there’s so many winners in here. 

 

Chip:  You know, and this is how we used to do it before testing came along, right?  We just looked at it and picked them, and all the greatest weed in the world was chosen this way. Right? Until recently, we didn’t [inaudible 37:39] to tell us what to do.

 

Freaux:  Pretty much trial and error.

 

Chip:  It’s trial and error. But if you were so inclined, that you could pick the you know, test every single one in here and pick the one out by THC. Like, you know, that would be 250 tests of some sort. 

 

Freaux:  Yeah. No. Yeah, I mean the, I mean, that’s a lot of tests right there. Just thinking about it, yeah. I mean, obviously, you can’t do that. I don’t know, you know? It’s hard to tell just looking at it what’s gonna you know, what’s gonna have the most highs, you can’t look at it – 

 

Chip:  It’s solely for growth, man. And I mean that’s why I asked you in here, because man, it’s like, near impossible to pick it out of all of these different plants.

 

Freaux:  Well, when you look at it  talking like that, you look at different ones and you just see that. There’s some plants that are you know, look crazy have you know, crazy crystals, but you know, they don’t test high in THC. There’s some that might not look as good  and they’re high in THC. I mean, that’s why it’s kind of one of the things –

 

Chip:  That may look great, but don’t have any, like terpene expression.

 

Freaux:  No, I know.

 

Chip:  Right? Like, that’s it. That’s a common one right there. That’s a common one right there.

 

Freaux:  I know, I know, me personally with Jive, we try to get you know, terpenes are what we’re looking for particularly. So it’s one of those things where, you know, smell, taste, really, you know, aromas and stuff like that, that tends to be the ones that test like, higher in, you know, terpene content or whatnot. The THC, you know, for us and stuff like that, that’s something that we don’t try to focus on. I know there’s a lot of people like, “Hey, what’s the highest test for THC?” And – 

 

Chip:  I got that 30%.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, and you know, and then you get the weed, it’s really not enjoyable or sometimes it doesn’t even get you high. Like for which you wanna get high. It was really like, you know, classic effects like euphoric, uplifting and all that stuff, you know, comes from, you know, terpene. It’s  not THC.

 

Chip:  No, THC is just part of the story.

 

Freaux:  It’s just part of the story. It’s one of the things once it’s testing, you know, in my opinion, up to like, you know, mid, you know, mid-teens or whatever, it’s gonna give you the effect of like, you know –

 

Chip:  You smoke a little bit more of it.

 

Freaux:  Yeah. And is it is it enjoyable, though? You know, you wanna taste something, it doesn’t have a taste, doesn’t have a good smell. I mean, THC isn’t everything in my opinion.

 

Chip:  Yeah, absolutely. So yeah it’s hard to say.

 

Freaux:  Yeah and look –

 

Chip:  It’s hard to say.

 

Freaux:  It’s impossible looking at it until you actually test it, so. 

 

Chip:  Let’s try to pick the, just the best one as we walk back down this way. Now you’ve seen it, let’s just pick one.

 

Freaux:  Alright, let’s do it.

 

Chip:  Okay. God, man. I mean like, I’m not, I don’t know man. I think –

 

Freaux:  I’m still gonna tell you the one I liked was –

 

Chip:  Was down here at the back here.

 

Freaux:  Yeah. The one that caught my eye [inaudible 40:43] was either this one, or this one. If you’re going you know, maybe not off like, plant structure, just the actual like, look of like, the bud, and the cola, and it looks super frosty. It’s got a lot of good color. It’s going to have that bag appeal. [inaudible 41:00-41:13] one of the ones further back there, but –

 

Chip:  [inaudible 41:16-41:22] Facebook man. This is the Green Rush Facebook group. I don’t know if you can hear us with all this wind, but you can download this episode at The Real Dirt podcast on iTunes. Go to therealdirt.com. You can check Freaux out at Jive Cannabis Co on Instagram. And hey, we’re gonna go see another greenhouse.

 

Freaux:  Alright.

 

Chip:  Let’s see. You’re gonna walk up this one right here.

 

Freaux:  I mean, just, that’s some pretty weed right there.

 

Chip:  Here we are with Freaux. This Chip with The Real Dirt, we’re looking at the phenotype expression of about 4000 seed plants.

 

Freaux:  This is beautiful right here.

 

Chip:  I get that, man.

 

Freaux:  That’s a T1000?

 

Chip:  That’s a T1000 Do-Si right there.

 

Freaux:  Look at that. She’s loving life right there. What would you describe the nose of this one?

 

Chip:  Here, hold this. Hold this.

 

Freaux:  It’s almost kind of got like, like a very grapey maybe like, some sort of, some sort of berry fruit almost.

 

Chip:  Flower. And it’s like a tea, almost like a, this is like a –

 

Freaux:  That was interesting, whatever it was.

 

Chip:  Green. Like a green tea. That sharpness of a green tea but –

 

Freaux:  Like a very green tea.

 

Chip:  But like, jasmine pearls? 

 

Freaux:  There you go, there you go.

 

Chip:  Yeah, there we go. It’s like jasmine pearl tea. Great pick, bro. Great pick, man. Oh, wow. Just by sight, like he really did – there it is. That’s The Real Dirt. That’s why I started this whole podcast, is to get people like you to come and like, show me what was up. That’s The Real Dirt. Yeah, man there’s a bunch of great T1000s in here. You know, these all survived 33 days, 30 degrees, right? And then they’re on both sides. It’s T1000 on both sides.

 

Freaux:  That’s another really good, look at that.

 

Chip:  Yeah, this one right here with the label on it. 

 

Freaux:  I like that you got them stacked in here like this too.

 

Chip:  Yeah, you know, it’s yes, these plants will grow better if they’re topped. But the way we get so many plants in here is by growing them untopped, you know? And packing them. In this room, there’s 450 plants. And it really lets us see a lot of what’s going on. This really the first time I’ve looked in here in the past several days, man, it’s really starting to stack out.

 

Freaux:  Oh yeah. Some beautiful phenos in here. I’m really liking this T1000 process.

 

Chip:  Yeah. Oh yeah, man, this baby’s beautiful right here. 

 

Freaux:  Oh wow, look at that. 

 

Chip:  Wow, hey, check this out. This is a total purple phenomenon I’ve seen over and over again. Look, there’s one green nugget coming off of it, and the rest of it’s purple. Right? It’s not hidden. Wow, that one’s a really nice one right next to it.

 

Freaux:  That one’s really cool.

 

Chip:  Oh, wow. These are getting close though, huh? What do you think?

 

Freaux:  They do look like they’re getting real close. When are you planning on pulling these?

 

Chip:  I’m just gonna take them in as long as I can. I mean, I think the 22nd is technically 10 weeks.

 

Freaux:  I would think that this house looks a little further along than the other one. Just off of looks, you know.

 

Chip:  Yeah, absolutely.

 

Freaux:  These look like they could be pulled in like, maybe a week we can have something like that.

 

Chip:  Yeah, there’s a big storm coming at the end of the week, we might pull some of them. But yeah, that’s exactly kind of our thinking. They might get pulled a little early. But it’s a struggle we’ve had and we have with outdoors, is finishing it. And you know, sometimes the mold you’re forced to like, harvest it beforehand. This is great man. We’ve done really well on our mold prevention, right? We’ve got a really, we’re on our pH, we’re using these pots that we’re planting in now, which is a product I manufactured these plant in bags. They really keep the pH perfect, really easy to plant. But we’ve been really on our pH and water filtration and that, I feel like those couple things have really helped with our mold. We just had some problems in the past. It’s so humid and hot here, man, it’s difficult. It’s difficult. 

 

Freaux:  I mean, looking great though, man.

 

Chip:  Alright, and let’s see, Oh, here we go. This is, here is where we start the, this is the Face Off. This is Face Off Do-Si-Dos on the right. And on the left, it’s SF v Do-Si-Dos.

 

Freaux:  [inaudible 47:24-47:27].

 

Chip:  Yeah. You know, it’s either way, either with the Face Off or with the OSG, it’s, has a very backcross type phenomenon. All these plants really have a similar look.

 

Freaux:  So he’s got a really good gas nose. The type of gassy nose everybody’s looking for.

 

Chip:  Man, there it is. And there’s just so many to choose from man. You see, you see what I mean?

 

Freaux:  You’re gonna have a hard time deciding one in here. I mean, I’ve never even personally seen like hundreds, you know, ran at one time at one variety.

 

Chip:  This is the largest one for us too, don’t get us wrong,

 

Freaux:  This is crazy, man. This is a treat to be in here for sure. Just seeing all these different phenos and all the expressions, and this is really a sight to see. I mean, really getting the full expressions that you can get out of these ladies, man. Just so many types of, so many types and varieties just, man.

 

Chip:  Yeah, the, you know, talking to Fletcher about all this, the Face Off Do-Si-Dos cross, he thought we would have really good luck with it, that it would be really uniform. If we were trying to sell it for bag flower. And you walk through here and look at it, and it does really all look a similar, have a similar look. There’s a couple standouts.

 

Freaux:  Really good nose, this one has a really good nose. You could really smell the Face Off in that one.

 

Chip:  Yeah, we grew Face Off for years. 

 

Freaux:  Super crystally.

 

Chip:  Yeah, we had a Face Off just recently, but we let it go.

 

Freaux:  How come you let it go?

 

Chip:  Man, it was actually, it died out of neglect. You know, unfortunately, with large operations like this, and I’m a little bit of a math professor. Like sometimes, plants get forgotten about or like, special projects of mine and, and that’s what happened. We had a dad and it died.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, some of that, and then that’ll happen. I mean, but hey, that’s why you got all these varieties out here now, find a better one, huh?

 

Chip:  Yeah, to find a better one. Absolutely. These were all feminized seeds. We had a couple hermaphrodite show on them but man, like, well above the 99.9%. Right? But you plant out so many seeds and you’re gonna see it. You know, it just happens.

 

Freaux:  I mean yeah, pretty much nature, you know? Man, this Face Off is pretty special man. I’m getting some really good aromas off these ladies.

 

Chip:  Yeah, so here’s the problem, right here. You see the mold?

 

Freaux:  Yeah, I see it.

 

Chip:  Yeah, that’s caterpillar damage. You can pick that off and you’ll see a little hole down in there, right? From where the caterpillar was eating it away. So, that’s our problem. That that will force us to harvest before the plants are ready unfortunately. But on our indoor runs, we get to take it all the way. We got a Rosie up in here so yeah, man. Well, I tell you, I want to take you over to the Lemon G house.

 

Freaux:  I’d love to see it.

 

Chip:  Let’s go see it. Let’s go to the Lemon G house. Ah, it’s just over and over again, huh? [inaudible 51:10-51:48] R&D at the greenhouse. [inaudible 51:50-52:02]. Watch out for this puddle.

 

Freaux:  Man, that Lemon G’s got a good nose.

 

Chip:  Man these things, so resilient. Huge, huge yield.

 

Freaux:  What would you describe like, a Lemon G nose as?

 

Chip:  Well man, that G13 has this own like, thing. I can see it in some of this stuff, right? But the it’s rind, it’s not lemon. It’s the rind, or like the outs like, it’s not the cut lemon. It’s not like that. That’s the rind.

 

Freaux:  No I think that’s a good way to describe it. We have a strand Sunshine Lime, has got Lemon G in it. And it has like, it definitely like a lemon citrus but like you said, it’s like a, there’s something else there. It’s like a rind like you said. I could definitely see that easily.

 

Chip:  Well yeah, look at this here man. There’s some just huge nuggets in here man. Like producer, this is the producer for sure.

 

Freaux:  I was literally about to just say that. This is definitely, the colas are the fattest in this house for sure. I would definitely say, man these, some of these, there’s double the size as some of the other houses we went through.

 

Chip:  Double, triple. Yeah, totally.

 

Freaux:  Man, that’s got a crazy nose right there.

 

Chip:  Yeah, these plants are all, a lot of them are five foot tall. There’s a few that are six foot tall. They were literally vegged for 23 days in a four inch pot from seed. Planted the seed in a four inch pot, 23 days later put in this pot and flowered it. And that’s how much these guys stretched. I mean, they were all about a foot or more tall, but like, still like.

 

Freaux:  Man, you got some Louisville sluggers in here man.

 

Chip:  Dude, totally man.

 

Freaux:  Straight up baseball bat.

 

Chip:  Yeah, right here. These guys, I can’t even see to the top.

 

Freaux:  I mean, that’s, I mean, I got a big arm. It’s double the size of my arm, some of these fellows. Look at that.

 

Chip:  Ah, it’s been fun, man. I tell you. We’ve got a couple other Facebook lives. Some Green Rush group now, this is The Real Dirt podcast in the season, I’m a little hot and sweaty. But man, we love showing you guys some of our videos this summer. We haven’t really shown them other places, but we’ll try to put some more out here on this channel. Oh, yeah, this one. This one right here has that lighter green color, right? A little bit more less leaf, more calyx development.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, that’s crazy. Look at that. You’re like psycho production too.

 

Chip:  Oh it’s sticky man. It’s sticky.

 

Freaux:  This is the first one I’ve come across that had some. I like that little expression of color. Although there’s something with me –

 

Chip:  You like that purple, you from the south, aren’t you? Wait a second. I can hear the Lana or is it Nashville in your voice. What is it?

 

Freaux:  I spent a lot of time in New Orleans and Atlanta – 

 

Chip:  Atlanta, ATL.

 

Freaux:  Spent a lot of time in Atlanta, I was out there for quite a while, spent there pretty much  – 

 

Chip:  They like that purple up in there.

 

Freaux:  They do.

 

Chip:  Yeah, give me that purple, smells like purple.

 

Freaux:  Yeah.

 

Chip:  This is my native tongue. I’m from Georgia. This is the way we all speak there. I’ve worked hard to mask my accent to sound like a straight, straight gentleman.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, you pinned that right. They definitely do like colorful weed out there.

 

Chip:  Man. I mean and everywhere, but this is a great one. Wow.

 

Freaux:  That’s got a good nose right there. I love that Lemon G nose. I think this is gonna be just from what I’ve seen so far from everything, this is probably gonna to be the terpenes’ most unique profile, I think. I’m really getting some unique smells out of here.

 

Chip:  Dude, you know what my plan is? I’m gonna take this house and one just like it, and turn it all into sauce.

 

Freaux:  Oh, man. That’s gonna be tasty right there.

 

Chip:  I know, I know.

 

Freaux:  People are gonna love that.

 

Chip:  I might, we might keep some of it for smoking. But we grew this for sauce.

 

Freaux:  I gotcha. People are gonna love the taste of that.

 

Chip:  Oh, this is gonna, there will be no better. But we really love it, man. It’s a great strain to grow. So yeah, man, we got some big nuggets. I feel like we, you were really able to see it in here. We’re gonna walk directly over to our other Lemon G house that was grown under a clear tarp. You ready to go?

 

Freaux:  Sounds good.

 

Chip:  Alright, here we are now. This is the greenhouse with just the clear tarp, right?

 

Freaux:  Wow, man. This is, what strain is this?

 

Chip:  This is the Lemon G, same strain. Same strain. I planted 600 seeds. This is 300, 300 over there.

 

Freaux:  Man, these are crazy fat in here. I like it. Man, this is even fatter than the other house.

 

Chip:  This is even better than the other house. But you know, let’s walk through it and see it man. Go, go, go. Go on. So the plants are maybe a little bit more uniform growth in here.

 

Freaux:  I could definitely see that. It looks like, it seems like the other tent it was like, man. I guess my initial thought would be there was like, a lot of fat nuggs. But then there’s you know, some other stuff. You look in here, just boom. Each bulb, everything’s prepped.

 

Chip:  Yep. And the diffusion of light works great in here. I’ll tell you, here’s the difference. You’re not as, over there, it’s so sticky. Right? That’s the difference. Like feel, like, when you walk through here, that is not as sticky.

 

Freaux:  It’s not.

 

Chip:  It’s not as sticky. It doesn’t have that smell either. And that’s how we noticed it initially, it was just the smell, right? I haven’t scoped it, but these buds like, look like they look more uniform, which we’ll make bigger. I think they’re a little further along though. Right? Like that blue house is, seems a little earlier.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, I could definitely see that. I could easily see that.

 

Chip:  But the buds are looking better in here. But they’re earlier and maybe more resinous in the blue tarp.

 

Freaux:  No, I could definitely see that. Just looking through it like halfway through it. I think there was a little bit of resin production in the other ones. But like you said, these do look further along. And I mean, I mean every plant in here is crazy fat. I like how you scroll down with –

 

Chip:  Yeah, totally. Totally, totally, totally.

 

Freaux:  Little trading right there.

 

Chip:  Yeah, that’s how we keep the bugs down right there. We’ve got these Boston terriers, French Bulldogs trained to track down any and all bugs. They also lick PM clean that bottom branches. And they do a real good job of that, because they have such low fur. They don’t bring any dirt, or debris, or bugs in.

 

Freaux:  Man, this Lemon G man, is beautiful. I really like this plant.

 

Chip:  Oh man, it is now one of my favorites.

 

Freaux:  I can’t believe how fat it is in here, man.

 

Chip:  Oh dude, it’s huge. It’s huge.

 

Freaux:  I mean, these are literally two times the size of my arm. Some of these colas are literally double my wrist.

 

Chip:  Yeah, huge nuggets, so uniform. Like, some of it, you see the DoSi purpleness in it.

 

Freaux:  There goes me with my purple again. 

 

Chip:  Yeah,  there’s your purple. There’s the purple.

 

Freaux:  I like the way that plant looks a lot.

 

Chip:  A little bit of caterpillar mold in here. But man, just incredible, incredible nuggets. So do you do use, what type of spreadsheets? Or what type of cataloguing do you use to keep track of your phenos when you’re..?

 

Freaux:  I mean right now –

 

Chip:  I just walked down to almost the end, I’ll show you my favorite one. Well you got to keep a list of it somehow.

 

Freaux:  It’s just like, by hand right now. I mean, we just, pretty much just writing it down on paper, taking some notes on it as far as like, you know, what we like, what we don’t like. But I don’t have any like, uniform the way, I should get more organized and put it in like a spreadsheet or whatnot. But I’m pretty much just you know, piece of – oh wow. Look at that one. This is the one you’re talking about?

 

Chip:  This is one of the ones I was talking about, right here. Look at this. Yeah, dude.

 

Freaux:  Damn. Oh, that’s got a nose on it too. That’s gonna be some heat right there man. I like that a lot. That’s got a great nose right there

 

Chip:  Yeah, purpley leaf –

 

Freaux:  This is your favorite?

 

Chip:  That’s one of my, I got another one like, right around here. Oh yeah, this. Let’s see this, one of these white ones right here, because this is the purple one. And then there’s a big white one long, but it might be like, I see, I think I see it further down here. We got that purple, we got the white. Yeah, I’m not very much of a [inaudible 1:02:55] but…

 

Freaux:  Beautiful, beautiful weed in here, man.

 

Chip:  Oh, this is it. This I think is my favorite right here, this one.

 

Freaux:  Did you say these were fems or they’re [inuadible 1:03:06]?

 

Chip:  These are all fems. Lemon G fem, Lemon G Do-Si-Dos.

 

Freaux:  It’s got a lot of uniformity in this particular shelf.

 

Chip:  Oh yeah. Just as far as like, plant growth production, man I often choose plants just on like, how they grow more than like the nuggets they make.

 

Freaux:  So man, this particular plant? So all the other ones are you know, big and everything. But this particular plant it’s big and swelled out, but it’s just crazy dense.

 

Chip:  It’s so hard, man. It’s like a –

 

Freaux:  Man, that’s got some good, good density to it. And all the other ones are like big and spread out, but then this is, that feels nice man.

 

Chip:  Yeah that’ll produce. That’ll produce. Sweet, yeah. Let’s walk out into this next house. 

 

Freaux:  Oh wow.

 

Chip:  Here we are, Chip Baker with The Real Dirt. I’m with Freaux, we’re in house number 412345 here, and once again, we entered a house with saying, “Oh wow.”

 

Freaux:  This looks great. In every one we’re going into, there’s something different.

 

Chip:  Yeah, it’s just, I know man. It’s so cool to see it all.

 

Freaux:  I like you got this one trellis too.

 

Chip:  Yeah, you know, we, this is all Sour D on the right. And all Sherbadough Do-Si-Dos on the left. And it just became real easy for us time and space to do it. The other plant, the other ones, I’m really looking at them. And so we left them go a little longer before we you know, staked them up and. If you want to trellis stuff, you really need to put it in early, putting it in there late is a pain in the ass so. But all the rest of the stuff is trellis pretty much from here on out. Yeah. So, this is the Sour D on the right and the Sherbadough Do-Si-Dos on the left.

 

Freaux:  So the Sour D and then –

 

Chip:  Sour, Sherbadough, Do-Si-Dos.

 

Freaux:  That’s got straight Do-Si structure. That’s how [inaudible 1:05:14].

 

Chip:  Here’s that purple for you. Let’s get a close up on this purple.

 

Freaux:  That’s got a really nice color on it. Sherbet Dosi is what, Sherb times Do-Si?

 

Chip:  It’s Sherbet DoSi –

 

Freaux:  Times Do-Si-Dos. 

 

Chip:  Do-Si-Dos.

 

Freaux:  Gotcha.

 

Chip:  Yeah. So yeah, there’s the Diesels over here. You know, Diesel is one of my favorite plants of all time. And it’s a little later, it’s just starting to come around. But there’s some good phenos in here. I think this one right next to us right there, it looks pretty good in front of you. But yeah, this stuff’s all got weeks and weeks more.

 

Freaux:  Man, all the time I’ve ever ran a Sour Diesel, I don’t know how real the cut was or whatnot. But look like, that thing could have gone 12 weeks easily. If we cut it at nine or something like that, just to –

 

Chip:  Let it go. I’ve seen it go to 77 days many times. 70 days is the way you grow Diesel. But you can get five crops a year on a 70 day Diesel man, you know? Oh, there’s Wyatt, our farm manager slash head grower. What’s going on, Wyatt?

 

Wyatt: Just growing great weed, hanging out. 

 

Chip:  Oh, did you vote today? Who’d you vote for? Is that [inaudible 1:06:40]? 

 

Wyatt: I voted for [inaudible 1:06:42].

 

Chip:  [inuadible 1:06:44] for president. [inaudible 1:06:45] for president.

 

Freaux:  There you go. Have you seen anything that has like, a really good traditional like, Sour D nose? I mean, Sour D’s got –

 

Chip:  And it’s just starting to come around, man. It’s just, but this cut, I’m pretty sure Fletcher got this cut from me years ago. And this is the Sour Diesel, East Coast Sour Diesel cut. Right?

 

Freaux:  That’s some of the best smelling weed known to man right there.

 

Chip:  Yeah. Oh, absolutely. And one of the first branded weeds. OG, Diesel, they are about the same. Same time, right? Oh, dude, this a nice, nice purple one’s got some nice colors here. And some braiding.

 

Freaux:  That’s kind of, that’s kind of crazy.

 

Chip:  Yeah, this is all cutting edge nutrients. Our soil, we added an organic complex to it. We’ve used both their synthetic line and their organic line.

 

Freaux:  Which one you like better?

 

Chip:  Man, here’s my advice for people. If you want great, organic weed, is get your plant established and growing using three part Cutting Edge and like, a four inch pot. And then when you transplant it into your forever pot that’s got other organic nutrients in it, right? Water it like, once or twice with Cutting Edge synthetic nutrients. Once at the start of flower, once at the end of the stretch. And man, you’ll have great huge, incredible tasting, not purely organic, but organish versions. And then all the other, all the other waterings, use organic.  His Organic, His Sonoma Gold Organic, right? But just like, two synthetic waterings, establish the plant with the Cutting Edge and man, that grows great organish weed, for sure. And that’s kind of what we have here, right? This is both John’s Sonoma Gold, and the Cutting Edge three part, and organic product in it. It’s now just getting water and will get water for the rest of his life. So I like a combo. I don’t have to be a purist anymore. Oh, you like that pure, pure, purple nugget though, don’t you?

 

Freaux:  Man, this might be the best col I’ve seen on any of the houses –

 

Chip:  Oh nice.

 

Freaux:  I really like the way this looks. It’s got some nice density. It’s got the color, color bag appeal. Good nose. Just really caught my eye as far as looking.

 

Chip:  Yes, oh man.

 

Freaux:  I mean everything down to the –

 

Chip:  I mean what I really like about it, is even the nuggets near your knee are the same maturation kind as the nuggets towards the top, you know? I mean yeah of course it –

 

Freaux:  It’s got the Do-Si structure too.

 

Chip:  Yeah, yeah. Yeah the Diesel has a reputation for having you know, more feathered buds, right?

 

Freaux:  Diesel always kind of had like you know, you get a bag of Diesel, it’s usually like, kind of smaller popcorny, almost like, kind of like this nugget looks right there. You know very, doesn’t really come on being the huge biggest nuggets, but to me Diesel’s always had one of the best nose and taste there is.

 

Chip:  Yeah, man. You hit diesel right and that Super Skunk comes out it, and it just grows incredible man. I’d say the nugget by your elbow is more like Diesel like, there’s a, man it’s really taken on the hybrid appearance. I think in the next coming weeks, we’re really gonna see the Diesel come out of it.

 

Freaux:  It almost has that like, traditional Diesel look, like, you know, that orange and the light like that and the –

 

Chip:  Yes. Totally. And I think this nugget’s gonna look like that. It’s just, you know, it just needs a few more weeks. Right? Yeah, so we’ll give all these like, maybe two more waterings with the Sonoma Gold I think. And then these will be done, man these  Sherbet Dosis, I think they might just be on water. Oh, look at this purple.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, there’s a couple different similarities with these purple ones that you can kind of see as it stacks down, like a lot of similarities you know, genetic wise having that like, look. That’s another one I like a lot. I still think I like the one down there that’s a little fatter, but I really like the way this looks right there. This one pretty much if you’re looking at like one of these types of phenos, that went down there that like filled out better, stacked a little fatter. You know, down there would probably be, obviously you gotta smoke it and, you know –

 

Chip:  Yeah, yeah, right, right, right.

 

Freaux:  Just for the look, that would be the, if you’re looking for the purple, looking for the thickness, you can easily see that that particular type of pheno down there would be almost like, all the good attributes of it, you know?

 

Chip:  Yeah, there’s so many more to choose from. Like, this is a good hybrid of a yield or like, that’ll be a purple for sure. But it’s just a little further behind than these other ones.

 

Freaux:  Man, this is crazy. This is a treat to see the, I mean just all the –

 

Chip:  I’m glad I could share it to you man.

 

Freaux:  Man, I mean –

 

Chip:  Do you people understand it, they’re just like, “Look at the buds, man.” But like –

 

Freaux:  We’re pretty much directly in one of your, you know, one of your houses. And as far as you can see the right, as far as you can see the left, and just, I mean, hundreds. What is there, 500, 600 plants in here?

 

Chip:  550 plants, right.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, I mean, just man, this is crazy. Seeing all the expressions that –

 

Chip:  Oklahoma, man. This is where it’s at. Oklahoma gives us this freedom because we don’t have square footage, and regulations, and we don’t have plant count regulations, and people might complain about the market. But man, I’m here for the weed, they say make good weed if you grow a lot of it.

 

Freaux:  Yeah. Man, you’re doing a good job with this. This is, is super impressive. Chip:. I mean –

 

Chip:  No, thanks, man. It’s been fun, dude. You know Wyatt, he’s, you can follow him at [inaudible 1:13:22] on Instagram. I don’t know if you do, but he’s a big fan of yours. And he’s been in charge of growing all this weed. He’s made all this stuff happen. I mean, you can look at it and you see there’s the random yellow plant, right? The health of the garden is impressive to me. That’s for sure.

 

Freaux:  He’s doing a great job. This is super impressive. This is some bubbles right here?

 

Chip:  And now we get to the, this is the Bubba –

 

Freaux:  Bubba Dosi?

 

Chip:  Bubba Diagonal. 

 

Freaux:  Bubba Diagonal.

 

Chip:  Dosi. Bubba Diagonal Dosi in here.

 

Freaux:  Oh, that’s got that like chocolatey, kind of Bubba like, that’s got a crazy nose right there man.

 

Chip:  Caterpillars. Caterpillars. Yeah, so Bubba Diagonal crossed with Dosi, this was also a suggestion, all these that I’ve shown you so far were suggestions from Fletcher. He suggested the Diesel because he knows how much of a Diesel plant fan I am. But I was like, “Hey, man, I want to buy some bulk seeds out of all the stuff you got. You know me, I like stretchers. I want fuel. It needs to be like great, you know, mold resistant, plus resistant,” and he kind of like picked all this stuff out for me. And this is one of the ones that he thought had the most promise but he hadn’t really planted out a lot of it. So I’m glad I got to do it first here. We got about 300 different seeds of it that we planted out of this one. We’ll see in the next greenhouse and kind of here they’re on both sides of the aisle, I believe. Yeah, both is Bubba Diagonal. So they’ve all got this nice stretch and – watch out. Watch out.

 

Freaux:  It’s got a good nose. Pretty much every one I smelled had a good solid nose on it.

 

Chip:  Yeah, alright. Let’s see if we can get out of here. Let’s see. 

 

Freaux:  Damn. What are these? Holy shit man. 

 

Chip:  Alright, here’s our clone house. This is a kind of the start of the clone house. We’ve got –

 

Freaux:  That’s got to be Purple Punch.

 

Chip:  Purple Punch on the left. Look at that.

 

Freaux:  Man. That’s super impressive, man. That looks awesome.

 

Chip:  Dude.

 

Freaux:  You mind if I get a picture of this one?

 

Chip:  Of course bro.

 

Freaux:  I definitely want to get a picture of this one. This is –

 

Chip:  Yeah, you can take pictures of anything here. Man, we love this Purple Punch. People gibe us, Fletcher was like, “Don’t let people hear you say you like the Purple Punch.” But I like growing it. I’m growing the weed for the plants. And on the right is the Mac 1 man. And both of these plants right now are kind of my favorite growing plants. Right? I love the Mac 1, on how it has this like, cactus-like uniform growth. I like the high. It’s really great medicinal high to me. The Purple Punch is just incredible plant to grow. I love the way it looks. “Smells like Purple, man” has been one of my favorite like, phrases for years, and that’s exactly what that is.

 

Freaux:  Man y’all killed this Purple Punch, man. This is super impressive, Chip. Seriously.

 

Chip:  Ah, man, it smells so good too man. It smells so good.

 

Freaux:  It’s got a great nose on it.

 

Chip:  Yeah. Have you seen much Mac? Do you know much Mac here?

 

Freaux:  I’m not too familiar with the Mac. I’ve never actually grown it. I mean, I know it’s a really popular strain. It looks great, though. I mean, it looks great right here. 

 

Chip:  Yeah, I haven’t quite figured it out. But you can see it’s got a really leafy bud structure. We’re gonna see how it finishes out. But I mean, this is Thanksgiving-ish I think, if we’re lucky. These Purple Punch, we’re gonna take real soon though,

 

Freaux:  Man, y’all got that Purple Punch dolled into a pin right there, man.

 

Chip:  That shit’s good, dude.

 

Freaux:  I mean, if people could just see how happy these plants are out here, man. You know, I don’t have much experience. I don’t have any experience growing outdoor in this type of setting. But just to see I mean, I literally look like I’m looking at somebody’s indoor garden with the quality, so it’s crazy. The plants are absolutely loving it out here for sure.

 

Chip:  Man, this is, you know, I love growing clones. And I tell people all the time, like the beauty of light depth, the beauty of greenhouses, and the beauty indoor, is you can if you replicate it all the same way. The learning curve just like, explodes. But people think it should all be different, but as you, this looks like indoor room the way it’s set up

 

Freaux:  No, it really does. I mean, we’ve grown Purple Punch. I mean, we still grow Purple Punch. I mean, it looks just like an indoor plant. I mean, I literally I mean, you go through some of the houses and you can see you know, the, you know, the different utility that’s been you know, and you know, outdoor light depth and whatnot. But you look at this Purple Punch, and there’s really no difference of how it would grow outdoor opposed to indoor. I mean, and you know, with myself being familiar with the plant, I’ve seen it grown a bunch of times indoor, I feel like I’m looking at an indoor garden, seriously. I mean, this is awesome. This is some serious, serious quality right here, man.

 

Chip:  This is, I mean, iI ove growing clones. It’s fun. I’m really into the seed plants and growing things like that. But man, when you see the uniformity of the monocrop like this, it’s one of my favorite things.

 

Freaux:  This is, this house right here is very picturesque. I mean, anything you look is nice, even Canopy, super, super uniform, super color.

 

Chip:  Anybody would be proud for this one.

 

Freaux:  Yeah, this is a great one right here, man.

 

Chip:  Yeah, I think my whole crew is really stoked about this –

 

Freaux:  Y’all killing this one.

 

Chip:  We’ve got like, we’ve got eight greenhouses, and there are eight hoop houses and all of them look good, but man, this one looks great.

 

Freaux:  This one’s smashing man. Absolutely smashing.

 

Chip:  Yeah, you know, if I was forced on a veg scenario out on my bed scene to veg them just for one week after cutting, and the Purple Punch, it really needed about two, right?  What it needed is to go into this five gallon pot that’s maybe 7 to 8, 9 days and go into the five gallon, it’s for another week. And then it really knocked it out, and it just needs to be a little bit taller. And I kind of say the same for almost everything except this house next door. This is the Gilz Nilz. And man, it just kills it here man. Oh my god. And we’ll go look at that other Gilz Nilz on the other side too, but I, these literally, they were just clones that were barely rooted that we stuck in here as like, they were literally in 50 sheets, and put them in here like that. I know, look at that shit, right? Now, they loved it man. And this is some, this is currently some of my favorite weed to grow. We’ll walk around here, and let’s walk down here and look at these –

 

Freaux:  To me, I can always tell if it’s Gilz Nilz ’cause they got that very like classic, almost like witch hat look, almost like a triangle, you know what I’m saying? They grow almost like witch hats.

 

Chip:  Oh yeah, see my guys got to get some. We’ve had a couple dripper issues. Yeah, but just the perfectness of it. So this is where a bunch of flavors start. So let’s see. What do we got here? We’ve got –

 

Freaux:  Melonade?

 

Chip:  Melonade, melonade.

 

Freaux:  Smells good.

 

Chip:  Yeah. That, okay, there’s something wrong here. This isn’t Melonade. Let’s see here, here, here. Reach down there and grab one of those tags. It’s in the pots and see what those say. It doesn’t say anything, alright. These I’m pretty sure are mislabeled, and they’re Granddad Dogs. Right here, these like nine plants right here. 

 

Freaux:  I see a number on these, and these are just red.

 

Chip:  Yeah, just yeah, I just see the color right. And then the Melonade starts. Right? And yeah, they’re kind of on both sides. And then for Mac and you see all this Mac really purpled out. 

 

Freaux:  And that’s a pretty plant man. 

 

Chip:  Mhm. And then, so all these plants I literally just took from a 50 sheet and planted directly in this whole greenhouse, hit right seed it green style.

 

Freaux:  How long did you grow them for?

 

Chip:  They were in, they, I rooted them. They were in a slab of 50 rockwool, they stayed in that slab for three or four days after they were rooted, and I just transplanted them in. And they just went right to flower, all these plants.

 

Freaux:  Man.

 

Chip:  Right. I know, they did great, huh?

 

Freaux:  They did awesome.

 

Chip:  This is a Cookies and Cream. Now I’m going to take you next door to a room they got the beds for one week, and you’ll get to see the difference. This is back to the CC4. This is CC4.

 

Freaux:  Man, that’s a pretty plant. 

 

Chip:  Yeah, I got a house next door. That’s that we vegged for a week, CC4. Yeah, let’s go see it. Oh, we’re back in the Lemon G’s. These were all the ruts. These are the ruts huh?

What is Topping? How to Top Cannabis

What is Topping? How to Top Cannabis

what is cannabis topping?

High quality yields are the goal of every grower. Topping your plants can be an easy way to increase your plant’s development for great results.

The process of topping is just about as simple as the name implies; cutting off the top of your plant. Sounds crazy right?

It makes sense when you think about though. Certain plants have a growth pattern that makes them grow taller, with a focus on a central flower.

While other smaller flowers may develop underneath the main flower, they won’t be as vigorous or strong due to the energy focusing on the top of the plant.

While this isn’t the case with all varieties of flowering plants, when you’re growing a plant with tall vegetative growth and a centralized growth pattern, you can benefit from topping.

What is Cannabis Topping?

Topping your plants might sound as simple as chopping off the top portion of your plant, it is a little more in depth than that. If left to grow on its own, a cannabis plant will grow vertically, focusing its energy on one main stalk.

The result is one long dominant cola with smaller stalks surrounding it. These smaller stalks will produce small, larfy buds that won’t be that good and the overall size and yield of the plant will be small.

Topping makes a cannabis plant bushier—by cutting off the main stalk, the plant will redirect its energies to the smaller side branches, which will grow out. If you let a cannabis plant grow naturally, it will usually grow one main stem, but if you top the plant when it’s young, you can cause it to grow multiple colas in basically the same amount of time!

During the vegetative stage of your plants’ growth cycle, cutting off a specific portion of the top of your plant can focus more growth hormones to the lower half to a more lush and even canopy.

After being cut, your plant will use more energy to regrow its central flower, and a portion of that is distributed throughout the rest of the plant.

How to Top Cannabis

For your first time topping cannabis, a good rule of thumb is to cut the plant above the 5th node of your plant, between the 6th and 7th node ideally. Doing so will give you enough branches on the bottom for your plants to bush out properly.

If you top lower than the 6th, you are going to be cutting away a significant portion of the upper growth on a plant.

If you want to continue toppings on the same plant, be sure to cut each branch above the second or third node to allow the plant to grow out properly. These toppings are more subjective, and will depend on how much you want the plant to bush out and how big you want the final plant to be.

When you top the plants, you are completely removing the upper growth. No new growth will develop from the growth tip that has been cut. This allows the lower lateral growth to assume the dominance.

Since there are two growth tips at each node, you effectively double the number of dominant growth tips every time that you top the plant.

Why You Should Top Your Cannabis

The benefits of topping are self-evident. If you compare a plant that is topped to one that is left to grow normally, the topped cannabis will always have bigger yields, more colas, and more flowering nodes than the plant left alone.

Topping cannabis helps focus more energy where your plant needs it most, and topping allows more light to hit portions of your plant that may have been blocked by their tops originally. As a form of Low Stress Training (LST), topping cannabis is one way to take more control over your plant’s production without seriously risking the plant’s health.

Unless you do it completely wrong, topping is an effective training method to produce bigger yields. Who doesn’t want that?

Growing Outdoor? Why You Should Consider a Greenhouse

Growing Outdoor? Why You Should Consider a Greenhouse

cannabis greenhouse for outdoor growing

Growing outdoors is cheap and effective, but mother nature can be unforgiving.

High speed winds, rain, hail, and even snow can come in certain parts of the country throughout the summer months. With more people growing hemp and cannabis outdoors than ever before, a lot of growers are going to find out the hard way that they could have benefited from a simple greenhouse.

It only takes one multi-thousand dollar outdoor crop getting destroyed for a grower to seriously consider a greenhouse or moving indoors. While growing indoors is almost always going to be the most expensive, the average grower would be surprised how much a simple, cheap greenhouse can do to protect your plants and even improve their quality.

Plant Protection

A greenhouse is great for protecting your plants from the conditions, but that’s not all. Some animals would love to get into your crop and have themselves a snack.

Keeping your plants covered in a greenhouse will stop them from being thrown around by harsh winds that can throw sediment and dirt that gets caught in your crop. It can protect from hail that can rip off leaves and completely destroy flowers, and a greenhouse can keep pests out.

Cost-Effectiveness

Building a greenhouse can be extremely cheap, or quite expensive depending on how much you want. A simple “hoop house” with curved steel poles and a tarp thrown over top will not break the bank, but it doesn’t offer the best protection.

However if you’re going to spend thousands of dollars getting a state of the art greenhouse designed and built with environmental controls, supplemental lighting and all the bells and whistles, it might be better to just consider growing inside!

Most of us will fall somewhere in the middle, mainly to add a few extra necessities like doors and some tech to control environment, but if you were doing nothing before, even a simple hoop house can make a world of difference.

Environmental Control

When you grow completely outdoors, your plants are at the will of the environment and all of its conditions. Rain, hail, winds, and especially dropping temperatures can all be prevented.

Not only does a greenhouse protect from the dangers of the environment, but it can give you more control over your own. You can keep your environment warmer by keeping the tarp down when it is colder outside. You can then roll up the sides of the tarp when the temperatures pick back to let in fresh air to circulate through your plants.

And with a simple tarp greenhouse, you can completely roll up the tarp during the day to let your plants have full access to sun, but roll it back down at night to keep them protected.

 Plant Quality

When you can build a greenhouse that almost perfectly simulates an indoor grow environment, it should be obvious that you will be able to produce higher quality plants as a result.

Keeping your plants protected from the conditions allows them to grow unhindered by damage. There won’t be nearly as much dirt or earth material in the flowers either because they’ll be protected.

Lastly, if you can control your grow environment even slightly more than just growing outdoors, you can grow better, bigger plants. And who doesn’t want that?

Should I Invest in a Greenhouse?

If you’re justing growing a handful of plants in your backyard, you probably don’t need to worry too much about a greenhouse. If your plants are damaged from a storm or hail, it won’t be a huge loss.

However if you’re growing outdoors at scale, with hundreds of plants to take care of, one big storm that comes out of nowhere can result in the loss of hundreds if not thousands of dollars in potential profit. When it comes to your career and getting that pay day, is investing a few thousand into a greenhouse that can completely protect and revolutionize the way you grow that tough of a choice?

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